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Tag Archives for " opinion "

GDPR has frustrated users and regulators

GDPR is turning one year old this month. It’s been a rocky ride.

The organization that runs the landmark privacy legislation’s implementation is underfunded. And the law itself seems to be better at annoying consumers, parents and anyone who uses the internet than holding tech giants accountable.

Full article: GDPR has frustrated users and regulators

New Data Protection Guidelines to Impact Online Services?

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) recently published draft guidelines which may impact online service providers’ ability to process personal data. The Guidelines are open for consultation until 24 May 2019.

The Guidelines are significant because the legal basis a service provider relies on determines, and impacts upon, the type and scope of its processing activities.

Full article: New Data Protection Guidelines to Impact Online Services? Mason Hayes Curran

Does Canadian Privacy Law Matter if it Can’t be Enforced?

While the U.S. relies on binding enforcement of privacy policies alongside limited sector-specific rules for children and video rentals, Canada’s private sector privacy law, which applies broadly to all commercial activities, has received the European Union’s stamp of approval, and has a privacy commissioner charged with investigating complaints.

The weakness of Canadian law became evident last week when the federal and British Columbia privacy commissioners released the results of their investigation into Facebook arising from the Cambridge Analytica scandal. After a brief negotiation, the Facebook simply refused to adopt the commissioners’ recommendations.

Full article: Does Canadian Privacy Law Matter if it Can’t be Enforced?

How one country blocks the world on data privacy

The GDPR is the world’s toughest standard for data privacy. But nearly a year later, its chief enforcer — the tiny nation of Ireland — has yet to take a single action against major tech firms like Facebook and Google.

Now, data-privacy experts and regulators in other countries alike are questioning Ireland’s commitment to policing imminent privacy concerns like Facebook’s reintroduction of facial recognition software and data sharing with its recently purchased subsidiary WhatsApp, and Google’s sharing of information across its burgeoning number of platforms.

Full article: How one country blocks the world on data privacy – POLITICO

EU GDPR in five years: Ten bold predictions

Though obviously no-one can predict the future, it is great fun thinking of what will have happened to privacy regulation in five years’ time. The EU GDPR has been an agenda-setting legal instrument but its effects are still only in their infancy.

Full article: EU GDPR in five years: Ten bold predictions | PrivacyPerfect

Even ticking a box does not necessarily mean consent is freely given

Digiday spoke to Giovanni Buttarelli, European data protection supervisor, to hear whether media and advertising businesses have done enough to comply. He believes Google and Facebook must work harder to achieve compliance.

Full article: Giovanni Buttarelli on state of GDPR adoption: ‘Even ticking a box does not necessarily mean consent is freely given’ – Digiday

‘Privacy Is Becoming a Luxury’: What Data Leaks Are Like for the Poor

The last few years have featured some of the largest and most potentially damaging data leaks in history, like the Equifax credit breach. But low-income Americans often find themselves trading personal information for access to benefits ranging from food to housing to childcare.

“For low-income people, the stakes [of a data breach] are higher,” said Michele E. Gilman, director of the Saul Ewing Civil Advocacy Clinic at the University of Baltimore, and a former Department of Justice civil rights attorney. She cited examples of former clients whose utilities were shut off after someone opened a false account in their name and failed to pay, or who were picked up on warrants for crimes committed by someone else under their name. For people without money to quickly reinstate a utility service or hire a criminal attorney, those types of errors—even if eventually rectified—can have long-lasting consequences, including job loss or child protective involvement.

Full article: ‘Privacy Is Becoming a Luxury’: What Data Leaks Are Like for the Poor – VICE

Can Facebook Ever Be Fixed?

From many scandals in 2018 to an actual spyware app the company paid users to download to downright disastrous security practices exposed earlier this year, the Facebook can’t seem to get much right.

In the recent post Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg proposes four new ideas to regulate the internet. However, the hard truth is that Facebook’s own interests diverge — in some cases, wildly — from those of its users. So its trust problem won’t change until its business model does.

Full article: Can Facebook Ever Be Fixed?

How to achieve digital governance?

Digital governance is corporate oversight of technologies that use personal or sensitive information, make autonomous decisions or exercise human-like responsibilities. The concept addresses disruptive technologies including artificial intelligence (AI), connected devices (IoT, cars, ubiquitous sensors, etc), and machine learning.

To establish digital governance programmes, companies must:

  1. first structure themselves accordingly,
  2. have a full picture of what they are doing,
  3. create an organisational culture that values fair digital practices.

Full article: Data Protection & Cybersecurity 2019 | Global Practice Guides | Chambers and Partners

How to address new privacy issues raised by artificial intelligence and machine learning

Artificial intelligence and machine learning present unique challenges for protecting the privacy of personal data.

For this reason, policymakers need to craft new national privacy legislation that accounts for the numerous limitations that scholars have identified in the notice and consent model of privacy that has guided privacy thinking for decades. The exacerbation of privacy externalities created by machine learning techniques is just one more reason regarding the need for new privacy rules.

Full article: How to address new privacy issues raised by artificial intelligence and machine learning

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