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Tag Archives for " privacy policies "

Website privacy options aren’t much of a choice since they’re hard to find and use

Many sites offer the ability to ‘opt out’ of targeted advertisements, but doing so isn’t easy. Simplifying and standardizing opt-outs would help improve privacy on the web.

Privacy policy language is inconsistent and ambiguous. Key terms aren’t standardized across privacy policies on different sites. That makes it difficult for users to scan or search for key words or phrases that might help them understand their options.

Once someone does manage to opt-out, it’s not always clear what will happen. Even when the choices are clear, the pages are not always easy to use.

Full article: Website privacy options aren’t much of a choice since they’re hard to find and use

As Apple stakes out an aggressive pro-privacy stance, Google occupies middle ground

The ad industry has been bracing for more privacy-focused upheaval in the coming months, from lawmakers and data regulators or from privacy-zealous browsers. As Google has put forward alternative plans for a privacy-focused and ad-funded web, it has also been asking the industry for feedback. This is a markedly different approach to Apple’s muscular stance of ultimate user privacy by default.

Google, as a predominantly ad-funded business with a lot more skin in the game, is revealing itself to be much more collaborative with the industry as it’s forming its approach. , Google has been exploring what restricted third-party cookie use in Chrome would look like by releasing industry research on how it would impact publisher revenue, laying out proposals for building a more private web, and using machine learning to manage ad frequency.

Full article: As Apple stakes out an aggressive pro-privacy stance, Google occupies middle ground – Digiday

Data Protection Commission engaging with Revolut as a “matter of urgency”

The Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) has said that it will be engaging with financial technology company Revolut as “a matter of urgency” over their new privacy policy and cookies policy changes Revolut announced this week.

Revolut’s new privacy policy means that users will have their data shared with social media and analytics companies for marketing purposes and also with credit bureaus, unless they actively opt-out.

Source: Data Protection Commission engaging with Revolut as a “matter of urgency” over privacy changes | JOE is the voice of Irish people at home and abroad

Apple is now presenting its privacy policy as if it were another product

Apple eleased a new privacy page that makes its privacy policy easier to read and understand. The new privacy page looks more like a product page than your standard screen of black and white text.

The new page brings in Apple’s design aesthetic, so it’s not just full of text. Most importantly, the update does make Apple’s privacy policies easier to read or skim. The policies themselves have not changed.

Source: Apple is now presenting its privacy policy as if it were another product | Engadget

Amazon announces privacy updates as its devices expand deeper into the home

Amazon will introduce a new privacy feature for the smart doorbells of its subsidiary Ring called “Home Mode”, which will prevent the doorbell cameras from recording footage when residents are home. Earlier this year, Amazon rolled out “privacy zones” which exclude selected areas in Ring’s field of vision from being recorded or viewed live.

The changes come as Amazon has faced scrutiny for recording customer conversations through Alexa and its public-private partnership with police forces through a smart doorbell company.

Source: Amazon announces privacy updates as its devices expand deeper into the home | Technology | The Guardian

OTA Analysis Finds Most Organizations Not Ready For New Privacy Regulations

The Internet Society’s Online Trust Alliance (OTA), which identifies and promotes security and privacy best practices that build consumer confidence in the Internet, announced today the results of its latest report, “Are Organizations Ready for New Privacy Regulations?”.

OTA analyzed 29 variables in 1,200 privacy statements against common themes in three major privacy regulations: the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), and Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA).

Source: OTA Analysis Finds Most Organizations Not Ready For New Privacy Regulations | Internet Society

Terms, Conditions and Considerations Under the GDPR

With the recent major GDPR cases on Facebook and Google, DPOs at smaller companies are getting worried and challenged in ensuring terms and conditions and privacy notices are not mixed up.

With hundreds of policy templates to choose from one of the difficulties is writing a privacy policy that is not so long that no one can read it, nor so short that it doesn’t cover the bases, but striking the right balance between the unreadable and the unworkable is essential.

Full article: Terms, Conditions and Considerations Under the GDPR – CPO Magazine

Most EU cookie ‘consent’ notices are meaningless or manipulative

New research into how European consumers interact with the cookie consent mechanisms which have proliferated since a major update to the bloc’s online privacy rules last year casts an unflattering light on widespread manipulation of a system that’s supposed to protect consumer rights.

The study, which looked at how consumers interact with different designs of cookie pop-ups and how various design choices can nudge and influence people’s privacy choices, also suggests consumers are suffering a degree of confusion about how cookies function, as well as being generally mistrustful of the term ‘cookie’ itself.

The researchers conclude that if consent to drop cookies was being collected in a way that’s compliant with the EU’s existing privacy laws only a tiny fraction of consumers would agree to be tracked.

Source: Most EU cookie ‘consent’ notices are meaningless or manipulative, study finds | TechCrunch

Research aims to automatically answer user questions on online privacy policies

Internet users may soon have a way to have their questions about online privacy policies answered automatically, thanks to a new multi-institution research project that includes Penn State. The project aims to enable people to ask questions about the privacy issues that matter to them when reviewing privacy policies.

The researchers will create software in the form of mobile applications, web browser plugins and interactive websites by developing and using algorithms in the areas of natural language processing, machine learning, and knowledge representation and reasoning. The interdisciplinary project aims to reinvent notice and choice — the idea that privacy policies are sufficient because users are given notice about how their information will be used and choices about what they can do in regards to the policy, such as opting out of certain features.

Source: Research aims to automatically answer user questions on online privacy policies | Penn State University

Longer Privacy Policies Are Better?

Everyone knows that most consumers don’t read privacy policies because they’re too long and confusing. Right?

But maybe that’s the wrong way to think about it. Privacy policies are useless from a consumer perspective regardless of whether they’re long or short, said Justin Brookman, director of privacy and technology policy at Consumer Reports.

Full article: Longer Privacy Policies Are Better – And Other Surprising Takeaways From The FTC’s PrivacyCon | AdExchanger

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