Tag Archives for " privacy policies "

The ethical and legal ramifications of using ‘pseudo-AI’

Pseudo-AI, or human workers performing work eventually intended for an  “artificial intelligence” or supplementing an AI still under development, is a common prototyping practice, necessitated by the inherit difficulty and large datasets necessary to create an AI. The revelation that human beings are regularly performing work customers are lead to believe is automated can have major trust and public-image ramifications, even if the primary service-providing company is unaware. Additionally, there are numerous legal ramifications.

Read full article: The ethical and legal ramifications of using ‘pseudo-AI’

Social site terms tougher than Dickens

Children may be signing up to apps with terms and conditions only university students can understand. The BBC carried out a readability test on 15 sites to work out the education level required to understand these policies and found that all 15 sites had policies that were written at a university reading level, and were more complicated than Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities”.

By having a hard to read policies while providing services to children, companies could be breaching European data rules, which require them to clearly spell out how they use personal data.

Source: Social site terms tougher than Dickens – BBC News

AI spots legal problems with tech T&Cs in GDPR research project

An experimental European research project applied machine learning technology to big tech’s privacy policies — to see whether AI can automatically identify violations of data protection law. Project results shows tah the AI was able to automatically flag a range of problems with the privacy policies, like use of unclear language, insufficient information, processing of personal data not in compliance with GDPR requirements,

Source: AI spots legal problems with tech T&Cs in GDPR research project | TechCrunch

Privacy policies of tech giants ‘still not GDPR-compliant’

Consumer group says policies of Facebook, Amazon and Google are vague and unclear Privacy policies from companies including Facebook, Google and Amazon don’t fully meet the requirements of GDPR, according to the pan-European consumer group BEUC.

Source: Privacy policies of tech giants ‘still not GDPR-compliant’

How not to write your GDPR-‘compliant’ data protection notice

GDPR requires companies to have a robust data processing notices. However, “obfuscating their data collection and processing activities on the personal data while using the keywords from the GDPR, some controllers are publishing revised DP policies that under-inform or misinform their customers.”

Read full article: How not to write your GDPR-‘compliant’ data protection notice

Privacy: A Quick Overview for App Designers

Privacy by design and by default is something that all developers will have learn. Here are some basic points app designers should know and take into consideration:

  • Privacy isn’t scary: it’s an opportunity to earn people’s trust.
  • This is about how we handle personal data.
  • Some data are sensitive, and we need explicit consent before collecting them.
  • System permissions for apps are not the same as explicit consent.
  • Everyone is entitled to certain privacy rights: to be informed (Notice), to see the data we collect (Access), to take their data elsewhere (Portability), and to have their data corrected or deleted (Right to Be Forgotten).
  • Here are some design patterns we can use to respect people’s privacy in our mobile apps.

Source: Privacy: A Quick Overview for App Designers – Prototypr

US Supreme Court Says Your Expectation of Privacy Probably Shouldn’t Depend on Fine Print

The Supreme Court unanimously ruled yesterday in Byrd v. United States that the driver of a rental car could have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the car even though the rental agreement did not authorize him to drive it.

We’re pleased that that the Court refused to let a private contract dictate Fourth Amendment rights in this case, and we hope it’s instructive to other courts, particularly those confronted with the argument that terms of service undermine users’ expectation of privacy in third party email.

Source: The Supreme Court Says Your Expectation of Privacy Probably Shouldn’t Depend on Fine Print

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