Tag Archives for " privacy policies "

How not to write your GDPR-‘compliant’ data protection notice

GDPR requires companies to have a robust data processing notices. However, “obfuscating their data collection and processing activities on the personal data while using the keywords from the GDPR, some controllers are publishing revised DP policies that under-inform or misinform their customers.”

Read full article: How not to write your GDPR-‘compliant’ data protection notice

Privacy: A Quick Overview for App Designers

Privacy by design and by default is something that all developers will have learn. Here are some basic points app designers should know and take into consideration:

  • Privacy isn’t scary: it’s an opportunity to earn people’s trust.
  • This is about how we handle personal data.
  • Some data are sensitive, and we need explicit consent before collecting them.
  • System permissions for apps are not the same as explicit consent.
  • Everyone is entitled to certain privacy rights: to be informed (Notice), to see the data we collect (Access), to take their data elsewhere (Portability), and to have their data corrected or deleted (Right to Be Forgotten).
  • Here are some design patterns we can use to respect people’s privacy in our mobile apps.

Source: Privacy: A Quick Overview for App Designers – Prototypr

US Supreme Court Says Your Expectation of Privacy Probably Shouldn’t Depend on Fine Print

The Supreme Court unanimously ruled yesterday in Byrd v. United States that the driver of a rental car could have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the car even though the rental agreement did not authorize him to drive it.

We’re pleased that that the Court refused to let a private contract dictate Fourth Amendment rights in this case, and we hope it’s instructive to other courts, particularly those confronted with the argument that terms of service undermine users’ expectation of privacy in third party email.

Source: The Supreme Court Says Your Expectation of Privacy Probably Shouldn’t Depend on Fine Print

Why Am I Getting All These Terms of Service Update Emails?

Anyone looking at their inbox in the last few months might think that the Internet companies have collectively returned from a term-of-service writers’ retreat.

Company after company seem to have simultaneously decided that your privacy is tremendously important to them, and collectively beg you take a look at their updated terms of service and privacy policies.

Source: Why Am I Getting All These Terms of Service Update Emails?

Businesses warned over GDPR privacy policies

Some updated privacy policies many businesses have recently sent to customers may not be compliant with new EU data protection laws, a watchdog has warned.

Many companies have issued new privacy terms to consumers ahead of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) taking effect on 25 May. However, European data protection supervisor Giovanni Buttarelli said some of the policies he has seen present a “take-it-or-leave-it proposition” that may not comply with the new laws.

Source: Businesses warned over GDPR privacy policies

Privacy by Design: Building a Privacy Policy People Actually Want to Read

Article 12 of GDPR mandates that privacy notices be “concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible”.

Legal design is not just a nice to have in the context of privacy; it’s actually a regulatory imperative. With this mandate, the team at Juro set out with a simple aim: design a privacy policy that people would actually want to read.

Source: Privacy by Design: Building a Privacy Policy People Actually Want to Read

EU: data-harvesting tech firms are ‘sweatshops of connected world’

The European data protection supervisor has hit out at social media and tech firms over the recent constant stream of privacy policy emails in the run up to GDPR, calling them them the “sweatshops of the connected world”.

“The most recent [Facebook] scandal has served to expose a broken and unbalanced ecosystem reliant on unscrupulous personal data collection and micro-targeting for whatever purposes promise to generate clicks and revenues.”

Source: EU: data-harvesting tech firms are ‘sweatshops of connected world’ | Technology | The Guardian

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