Tag Archives for " privacy policies "

What’s new in WP29’s final guidelines on transparency?

The Article 29 Data Protection Working Party has published its “last revised” guidelines on transparency under the General Data Protection Regulation.

When the WP29 released its proposed guidelines last December offering “practical guidance and interpretive assistance” regarding transparency obligations, IAPP analyzed the key issues. In addition to a brief summary of the transparency requirements, IAPP’s analysis of the proposed guidelines focused on the meaning of phrases such as “concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible” and “in writing or by other means,” as well as what information should be provided and when and how to provide this information to data subjects.

Source: What’s new in WP29’s final guidelines on transparency?

Facebook to change terms of service for members outside Europe ahead of GDPR

The company says that despite the timing of the move, all users will have the same data privacy protections.

Facebook will change the way it administers its terms of service (TOS) for 1.5 million users in Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America, the company confirmed today. Though users in those territories previously agreed to TOS dictated by the company’s corporate entity in the EU nation of Ireland, now they must legally agree to be bound by the US-based corporation’s terms.

Source: Facebook to change terms of service for members outside Europe ahead of GDPR – MarTech Today

Facebook starts to roll out GDPR notifications and consent requests

The company may have an uphill battle ahead to get users to share personal data.

Facebook previously announced that it would apply General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) privacy protections and rules globally to all its users. This was a major decision — partly practical, partly principled and partly public relations. Yesterday, the company began to explain how it will start implementation of the new guidelines.

Source: Facebook starts to roll out GDPR notifications and consent requests – MarTech Today

75% of consumers won’t buy your product if they don’t trust you to protect their data

More than three quarters of US consumers now say that a company’s ability to keep their data private is ‘extremely important,’ according to IBM.

Some 75% of consumers said they will not buy a product—no matter how great the product is—from a company if they don’t trust that company to protect their data.

Source: 75% of consumers won’t buy your product if they don’t trust you to protect their data – TechRepublic

GDPR Privacy Policy Fail: Only 34% of EU Sites Compliant

Just a third of websites in the EU and even fewer in the UK have their privacy policy in order ahead of major new legislation set to land next month.

The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) represents the biggest change to the EU’s privacy laws in almost a generation.

Source: GDPR Privacy Policy Fail: Only 34% of EU Sites Compliant – Infosecurity Magazine

Data Privacy Policy Must Empower Users and Innovation

As the details continue to emerge regarding Facebook’s failure to protect its users’ data from third-party misuse, a growing chorus is calling for new regulations.

Mark Zuckerberg will appear in Washington to answer to Congress next week, and we expect lawmakers and others will be asking not only what happened, but what needs to be done to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

Source: Data Privacy Policy Must Empower Users and Innovation

Facebook Previously Failed To Keep Privacy Promises

Noel King talks to Tim Wu, who was a senior advisor at the Federal Trade Commission in 2011, when the agency settled with Facebook for failing to protect user privacy.

Facebook says it is sorry. This past weekend, Facebook took out full-page ads in major newspapers apologizing for a, quote, “breach of trust.” The company placed the ads after news broke that a political data mining firm, Cambridge Analytica, reportedly used the data of 50 million Facebook users. One person who does not buy the apology is Tim Wu. He’s a former senior adviser at the Federal Trade Commission. And he was there in 2011, the last time that Facebook got in trouble for failing to keep its promises about privacy. Tim Wu is skeptical that the company will change its ways anytime soon.

Source: Facebook Previously Failed To Keep Privacy Promises, Ex-FTC Adviser Says : NPR

You’re Never Going To Read That Privacy Policy. Could AI Help?

It’s a common quip about privacy policies: They’re so complex, you need a law degree to understand them.

A team at Carnegie Mellon took it to heart. Led by professor Norman Sadeh, the group asked law students to annotate more than 100 privacy policies from companies like Google and Facebook–putting their legalese into relatively plain language. Then, Sadeh’s team used their work to train an AI to do the same thing for 7,000 other privacy policies, effectively creating a searchable database that lays out these policies in clear terms. On their new portal, anyone can explore these Cliff’s Notes to common apps and websites, which are even rated by the grade level of their language.

Source: You’re Never Going To Read That Privacy Policy. Could AI Help?

The Truth Behind Vero’s Privacy Claims and Strange Success

New social network Vero takes its name from the Latin for “truth” and has positioned itself as a privacy-focused social network.

But press releases and marketing show us only what the company wants us to see. We were curious: what’s really behind the hype?

Source: The Truth Behind Vero’s Privacy Claims and Strange Success

AI tool scans privacy notices to inform users on data collection

A 2008 study conducted by a pair of Carnegie Mellon University researchers found it would take the average person 201 hours to read every privacy notice they encountered in a calendar year. Since then, the number of websites, apps, and services have skyrocketed, and in Feb. 2016, a different pair of researchers took notice of the rise in popularity of “chatbots” and decided to create one to answer questions about organizations’ privacy policies.

That bot would eventually be called PriBot, and it was brought to fruition by Hamza Harkous, a postdoctoral researcher at École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, and Kassem Fawaz, assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Source: AI tool scans privacy notices to inform users on data collection

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