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Tag Archives for " ransomware "

Making or Facilitating Ransomware Payments May Violate U.S. Sanctions

On October 1, 2020, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) published an advisory that highlights the risk of potential U.S. sanctions law violations if U.S. individuals and businesses comply with ransomware payment demands.

OFAC’s advisory neither describes new penalties for ransomware payments nor expands existing law or provides new authority for imposing sanctions. Rather, in releasing its advisory in conjunction with a similar advisory from the U.S. Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), OFAC is sending a clear signal that making ransomware payments with a sanctions nexus threatens U.S. national security interests and that third-party service providers that facilitate ransomware payments on behalf of a victim must consider and ensure compliance with OFAC regulations.

Source: Office of Foreign Assets Control: Making or Facilitating Ransomware Payments May Violate U.S. Sanctions

Woman dies during a ransomware attack on a German hospital

It could be the first death directly linked to a cybersecurity attack. Experts have been warning for years that this would happen.

A woman in Germany died during a ransomware attack on the Duesseldorf University Hospital, in what may be the first death directly linked to a cyberattack on a hospital. The hospital couldn’t accept emergency patients because of the attack, and the woman was sent to a health care facility around 20 miles away.

The cyberattack was not intended for the hospital. he ransom note was addressed to a nearby university. The attackers stopped the attack after authorities told them it had actually shut down a hospital.

Source: Woman dies during a ransomware attack on a German hospital – The Verge

Garmin global outage caused by ransomware attack

The WastedLocker ransomware, used by a notorious Russian hacking group, is said to be to blame.

The incident began late Wednesday and continued through the weekend, causing disruption to the company’s online services for millions of users, including Garmin Connect, which syncs user activity and data to the cloud and other devices.

Source: Garmin global outage caused by ransomware attack, sources say | TechCrunch

94% of Those Who Pay the Ransom Get the Data Back

According to The State of Ransomware 2020 global study conducted earlier this year on behalf of Sophos, organisations that decide to pay to get their data back, do so in an efficient 94% of cases.

Overall, the research found that while a malicious file download or link was still the biggest danger (29% of successful attacks), other methods such as remote attacks on servers (21%), unsecured Remote Desktop Protocol (9%), external suppliers (9%), and infected USB drives (7%) were also popular.

The research questioned 5,000 IT managers from 26 countries (500 from the US and 200 from the UK) in a range of sectors and company sizes from 100 to 5,000 employees.

Source: Huge toll of ransomware attacks revealed in Sophos report – Naked Security

Bitcoin ransomware locks 10 years’ worth of government data in Argentina

Bitcoin-hungry hackers have attacked a data center in Argentina which houses local government files.

The size of the Bitcoin ransom is unknown, but reports suggest attackers asked for somewhere in between approximately $37,000 and $370,000 (0.5 and 50 BTC) in exchange for decrypting the files.

The center had already recovered 90 percent of the encrypted data. Decrypting the files will take at least 15 days, mostly due to the sheer size of the archive. Some 7,700 GB — approximately 10 years worth data — was originally compromised as a result of the attack.

Source: Bitcoin ransomware locks 10 years’ worth of government data in Argentina

Ransomware increases 74.23% year on year

New research by Bitdefender identifies a significant rise in ransomware this year, in comparison to 2018.

In its Mid-Year Threat Landscape Report, researchers noted that since the fall of GrandCrab earlier this year, many spinoff ransomware families have filled the gap.

The top three threats facing business and consumers included coin-mining malware, commonly used in cryptojacking campaigns, exploits leveraging unpatched or previously known vulnerabilities and fireless attacks and banking trojans.

Source: #Privacy: Ransomware increases 74.23% year on year

Study reveals 2019’s darkest cyber-threats

Webroot has released its third annual Nastiest Malware list, shedding light on 2019’s worst cybersecurity threats.

From ransomware strains and crypto-mining campaigns that delivered the most attack payloads to phishing attacks that wreaked the most havoc, it’s clear that cyber threats across the board are becoming more advanced and difficult to detect.

Full article: #Privacy: Study reveals 2019’s darkest cyber-threats

Danish company reveals a possible ransomware loss of $95m

Demant, a hearing aid company, has revealed that it is expected to incur losses of up to $95 million, following a ransomware attack.

In a company announcement, on September 3, the company had experienced a critical incident on their internal IT Infrastructure.

In the announcement, the company stated that is was able to assess the financial impact of the incident, and it was found that the total negative financial impact on the firm ranged from DKK 550-560m ($80-95m). This figure also includes a deduction of DKK 100 ($15m) from insurance coverage.

Source: #Privacy: Danish company reveals a possible ransomware loss of $95m

New US ransomware bill passed

The US Senate has passed a bill that is aimed to protect public institutions like schools and law enforcement, from ransomware.

The DHS Cyber Hunt and Incident Response Teams Act would authorise the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to create teams to help both private and public entities defend against attacks.

Additionally the cyber hunt and incident response teams, will provide support and technical advice, as well as provide incident response assistance.

Source: #Privacy: New US ransomware bill passed

DLA Piper and its insurers clash over multi-million NotPetya payout

Multinational law firm DLA Piper was hit in the crossfire as Russia-backed ransomware spread, and Hiscox is reportedly declining to pay up citing an “act of war”.

DLA Piper has started proceedings against Hiscox, saying that the insurance firm has failed to pay out for the damages and costs associated with the NotPetya attack – a claim which may amount to several million pounds.

Source: DLA Piper and its insurers clash over multi-million NotPetya payout

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