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Tag Archives for " regulation "

How Washington state lawmakers plan to regulate data privacy and facial recognition

Washington state legislators will push for new regulations governing data privacy and facial recognition next year.

The new legislation builds on a bill that passed the Senate before dying in the House last session. The bill’s sponsors say they are taking lessons from that experience, though several of the sticking points that contributed to the last bill’s demise remain.

Source: Sneak peek: How Washington state lawmakers plan to regulate data privacy and facial recognition – GeekWire

Senate Democrats unveil priorities for federal privacy bill

A group of top Democratic senators from four key committees on Monday unveiled their priorities for the nation’s first comprehensive privacy bill, reinvigorating a debate that had stalled for months on Capitol Hill.

Legislation built on the Democrats’ stated priorities would limit how much sensitive information tech companies are allowed to collect on their millions of U.S. users, require companies to audit whether their algorithms result in unintended discrimination against minorities and vulnerable populations, and allow users to sue companies that do not protect their privacy rights.

Source: Senate Democrats unveil priorities for federal privacy bill | TheHill

Interpol: Strong encryption helps online predators. Build backdoors

Multinational police agency Interpol is due to say that tech companies deploying strong encryption helps paedophiles – unless they build backdoors for police workers.

So-called “think of the children” rhetoric is a tried and trusted strategy for police workers who are determined to get their way with politicians. The agency has yet to issue the communique in question, though it is expected to be welcomed by Western governments increasingly fed up that their internal security agencies are unable to exercise China-style social control and surveillance over their populations.

Source: Interpol: Strong encryption helps online predators. Build backdoors • The Register

Facebook, Google Fund Nonprofits Shaping Federal Privacy Debate

Few companies have more riding on proposed privacy legislation than Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. To try to steer the bill their way, the giant advertising technology companies spend millions of dollars to lobby each year, a fact confirmed by government filings.

Not so well-documented is spending to support highly influential think tanks and public interest groups that are helping shape the privacy debate, ostensibly as independent observers.

Source: Facebook, Google Fund Nonprofits Shaping Federal Privacy Debate

Consumer Data Privacy Rights: Emerging Tech Blurs Lines

Data privacy is a fundamental right for Americans – but new emerging technologies like drone, IoT and facial recognition are introducing gray areas.

Lawmakers for their part are taking steps to enforce regulatory efforts for data privacy – but still have a long way to go.

Full article: Consumer Data Privacy Rights: Emerging Tech Blurs Lines | Threatpost

IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition tech instead of bans

IBM wants the US government to regulate facial recognition technology, instead of banning it outright. “Precision regulation” can restrict potentially harmful uses while still allowing for innovation, the company said Tuesday in a white paper posted online.

Facial recognition has faced backlash from privacy advocates and lawmakers, and a handful of cities have banned the municipal use of the technology. In July, Microsoft asked the federal government to regulate facial recognition before it gets more widespread. Still, the technology is on track to become pervasive in airports and shopping centers, and some companies like Amazon are selling it to police departments.

Source: IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition tech instead of bans – CNET

The Senate’s secret algorithms bill doesn’t actually fight secret algorithms

In the case of the Filter Bubble Transparency Act, it’s not just spin; it’s an example of how badly defined buzzwords can make it impossible to address the internet’s problems. The bill is named after Eli Pariser’s 2011 book The Filter Bubble, which argues that companies like Facebook create digital echo chambers by optimizing content for what each person already engages with.

The FBTA aims to let people opt out of those echo chambers. Large companies would have to notify users if they’re delivering content — like search results or a news feed — based on personal information that the user didn’t explicitly provide.

However, the FBTA doesn’t make platforms explain exactly how their algorithms work. It doesn’t prevent them from using arcane and manipulative rules, as long as those rules aren’t built around certain kinds of personal data. And removing or disclosing a few factors in an algorithm doesn’t make the overall algorithm transparent.

Full article: The Senate’s secret algorithms bill doesn’t actually fight secret algorithms – The Verge

Legislation Would Force Google and Rivals to Disclose Search Algorithms

Senate lawmakers are teeing up a bill that would require search engines to disclose the algorithms they apply in ranking internet searches amid growing concern over their use of personal data and give consumers an option for unfiltered searches.

Search engines such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google unit use a variety of measures to filter results for individual searches, such as the user’s browsing activity, search history and geographical location.

Source: Legislation Would Force Google and Rivals to Disclose Search Algorithms – WSJ

Regulating Facial Recognition Tech – Where Are We Now?

While there are clearly now multiple efforts to curtail the use of facial recognition technology (FRT) in the public realm, the reality is that the genie is already out of the bottle and there is no way to put it back.

The efforts above range from limited bans within the public sector, to reviews of new implementations of the tech, to specific court cases against police use of FRT. In short, it’s a patchwork of efforts, and there are huge gaps between them. Many examples also tend to focus on State-backed projects, rather than in the private sector – which is also experimenting with the tech, often in the public domain.

Meanwhile, the technology and its use is still rapidly spreading around the world, and there remains as yet no fully tested national position on its use in countries such as the US and UK.

Full article: Regulating Facial Recognition Tech – Where Are We Now? – Artificial Lawyer

EU Council releases revised draft ePrivacy Regulation

On 30 October, 2019, the Presidency of the Council of the European Union released revised text of the proposed ePrivacy Regulation (Regulation Concerning the Respect for Private Life and the Protection of Personal Data in Electronic Communications and Repealing Directive 2002/58/EC).

The revised draft ePrivacy Regulation includes further clarifications to the scope of its application as well as several alternative options. In addition, further modifications are  introduced in the text, including in Article 2(2)(f), where the changes would specify that the processing upon receipt by a third party or end-user entrusted for the purpose of protecting the end-user’s terminal equipment would be outside the scope of the ePrivacy Regulation, and in Article 6a(2) where the new text specifies that the supervisory authority should be consulted, if necessary, in line with Article 36(1) of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The Draft ePrivacy Regulation will be discussed during the Working Party on Telecommunications and Information Society (‘WP TELE’) meeting on 7 November 2019.

You can read the Draft ePrivacy Regulation here.

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