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GDPR vs. CCPA

The General Data Protection Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2016/679) (‘GDPR’) and the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (‘CCPA’) both aim to guarantee strong protection for individuals regarding their personal data and apply to businesses that collect, use, or share consumer data, whether the information was obtained online or offline.

As highlighted by the Guide, the two laws bear similarity in relation to their definition of certain terminology; the establishment of additional protections for individuals under 16 years of age; and the inclusion of rights to access personal information.

Full article: FPF and DataGuidance Comparison Guide: GDPR vs. CCPA

GDPR territorial guide has ‘sting in tail’ for US companies

Guidance published by an EU data protection watchdog on the territorial scope of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is likely to raise concern about the costs to US companies of entering the EU market.

“The sting in this document is in the last line for US corporates,” Ann Henry of Pinsent Masons said. “It is the law-abiding companies that will appoint a representative. Arguably making a representative liable will make it more difficult to find people or bodies willing to take on the role of representative given the extent of potential liability both by means of regulatory enforcement and through private rights of action under the GDPR regime.”

Full article: GDPR territorial guide has ‘sting in tail’ for US companies

DP Impact Assessments: EDPB Differs Slightly from ICO Position

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has recently published its Opinion on the (United Kingdom) Information Commissioner’s list of processing activities which would require a Data Protection Impact Assessment under the GDPR.

In its Opinion, the EDPB appears to be moving away from the idea that processing of genetic or loca­tion data, on its own, might be enough to trigger the mandatory DPIA requirements of the GDPR. This news will perhaps come as a relief to organi­sations currently struggling to come to grips with the “new” DPIA process and the resources and time that it demands. But, should we be surprised by the EDPB’s Opinion and will it have a significant impact in practice on the way organisations consider and conduct DPIAs?

Full article: DP Impact Assessments: EDPB Differs Slightly from ICO Position

New EDPB Guidelines on the territorial scope of the GDPR

On 26 November 2018, the WP29’s successor, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) published, Guidelines on the territorial scope of the GDPR (Art. 3). The proposed Guidelines are open for public consultation until 18 January 2019. The Guidelines provide some clarification around the boundaries of what constitutes an establishment in the EU, the status of tourists and factors that determine whether data subjects in the EU are being targeted.

The EDPB also provides some guidance on the conditions of appointment of an EU representative for non-EU controllers and processors. However, the Guidelines do not address other key interpretive questions arising from Art. 3 and Chapter V (transfer restrictions) and leave many key legal questions open.

Full article: EU: New EDPB Guidelines on the territorial scope of the GDPR

The post GDPR landscape

With the panic over to ‘comply’ with GDPR, it is seen as becoming more of a day to day compliance matter. Of course, this assumes that organisations have the correct processes embedded in their day to day business and their staff are trained on and aware of the implications. However, there are still many questions around what is the correct approach.

Full article: The post GDPR landscape: Our Findings

The CLOUD Act and the Warrant Canaries That (Sometimes) Live There

The Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act (Pub. L. No. 115-141 (2018), or the CLOUD Act, was enacted in the U.S. on March 23, 2018, in response to difficulties U.S. law enforcement agencies (LEAs) had when attempting to gain access to data held by cloud service providers through Stored Communication Act (SCA) warrants, as the SCA did not contemplate cloud computing when it was enacted into law; likewise, LEAs were also forced to utilize U.S. Senate-approved mutual legal-assistance treaties (T.I.A.S. No. 10-201 or MLATs) or letters rogatory to access data stored overseas.

Full article: The CLOUD Act and the Warrant Canaries That (Sometimes) Live There

Spain finalises new data protection and digital rights law

A new law on data protection and digital rights has been approved by Spain’s parliament and will come into force in the coming days. The law will complement the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The new law, the Organic Law on Data Protection and Digital Rights Guarantee (LOPDGDD), was approved by a large majority in the Spanish Senate on 21 November after being nearly two years in development. The Senate did not amend any of the text that was previously approved by the Congress, ending a period of delay in the parliamentary process.

Source: Spain finalises new data protection and digital rights law

New Spanish Data Protection Law raises concerns over the use of sensitive data by political parties

The new Law on Data Protection and Digital Rights (LOPD), recently enacted in Spain, includes a highly controversial provision allowing political parties and organizations to collect and use personal data revealing political views of individuals.

The controversial article was introduced as a last-minute amendment to the bill, which was voted unanimously on October 18 by the House of Representatives (Congreso de los Diputados). By then, the contentious article had largely gone unnoticed by the public opinion. Shortly after that, however, concerns that political parties might get broad leeway to process sensitive personal data were widely reported in the mainstream media. Nonetheless, the Spanish Senate definitively approved the law on November 21 – including the controversial section. The text is expected to be officially published shortly.

Full article: New Spanish Data Protection Law raises concerns over the use of sensitive data by political parties | Center for Internet and Society

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