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Tag Archives for " regulation "

US lawmakers claim progress on online privacy bill

Key lawmakers maintained Tuesday that they are making progress in their efforts to put together the country’s first comprehensive online privacy bill after hitting several bumps in Congress late last year.

At the tech-funded State of the Net conference in Washington, D.C., lawmakers on the relevant House and Senate committees signaled they are grappling with the same obstacles that resulted in Democrats and Republicans putting out separate versions of a privacy bill last year – but insisted they’re still dedicated to bipartisan negotiations.

Source: Lawmakers claim progress on online privacy bill | TheHill

Lawmakers introduce bill to restrict NSA surveillance

A bipartisan coalition of US lawmakers have introduced a new bill that would protect Americans’ rights against unnecessary government surveillance.

The Safeguarding Americans’ Private Records Act, introduced by US Senator Roy Wyden, D-Ore, will reform section 215 of the PATRIOT Act and prevent abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Source: #Privacy: Lawmakers introduce bill to restrict NSA surveillance

Like CCPA, But Make it Virginia: States Scramble to Introduce Data Privacy Legislation of Their Own

With companies still scrambling to comply with the newly effective California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), other states continue to introduce data privacy legislation of their own.

Virginia added itself to the ever-growing list of states considering such bills when the Virginia Privacy Act (VPA) was introduced to the General Assembly for consideration January 8. The VPA combines the CCPA’s notice requirements with consumer rights similar to those found in the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Source: Like CCPA, But Make it Virginia: States Scramble to Introduce Data Privacy Legislation of Their Own | News & Knowledge | Adams and Reese LLP

Croatian Presidency tempers expectations on ePrivacy progress

The Croatian Presidency of the Council of the European Union is the just the latest EU presidency to try to tackle the ePrivacy Regulation.

Finland, Romania, Austria and Bulgaria were among the countries that could not figure out ePrivacy during their presidencies, and now it’s Croatia’s turn at the plate. While the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs pushed forward a version of ePrivacy back in October 2017, however, progress since that vote has essentially been nonexistent.

Full article: Croatian Presidency tempers expectations on ePrivacy progress

Reflecting on APAC Data Protection and Cyber-security Highlights for 2019 (and what lies ahead!)

2019 saw continued growth and change in data protection and cyber-security across the Asia-Pacific. Following the implementation of the GDPR in May, 2018, many jurisdictions moved to review and strengthen existing data privacy and cyber-security laws.

In addition, 2019 saw regulators publishing findings in respect of some of the largest data incidents of 2018. We have set out below the key highlights of the year and what to look out for in 2020.

Full article: Reflecting on APAC Data Protection and Cyber-security Highlights for 2019 (and what lies ahead!)

‘Prepare for ICO to utilise its wider powers’: UK regulator issues warning to adtech

The UK’s data regulator, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), has issued a warning to any adtech companies which have failed to “use the window of opportunity to engage and transform” their practices – it’s coming for them.

The ICO’s update on its investigation into the adtech sector reveals it focused on specific issues such as the treatment of “special category data” – like race, sexuality and health – as well as how secure data is as it’s passed through the supply chain and the thorny issue of Legitimate Interest.

Source: ‘Prepare for ICO to utilise its wider powers’: UK regulator issues warning to adtech | The Drum

EU to police digital assistants

European Union privacy watchdogs are gearing up to police digital assistants after revelations that Amazon.com Inc. workers listened in on people’s conversations with their Alexa digital assistants.

EU regulators are now working on a common approach on how to police the technology. But the move toward common guidelines for digital assistants means companies should avoid fines — for now.

Source: Amazon Alexa Eavesdropping Spurs EU-Wide Privacy Safeguards – Bloomberg

EU court adviser: data privacy laws should apply in national security cases

The European Court of Justice should uphold its 2016 decision that personal data cannot be seized and held indiscriminately by governments even on national security grounds, the court’s advocate general said in an opinion on Wednesday.

Reacting to four cases in France, Belgium and Britain in which governments called for greater powers to override data privacy, the advocate general, Manuel Campos Sánchez-Bordona, argued that EU law applies.

Source: EU court adviser: data privacy laws should apply in national security cases – Reuters

Will online privacy make a comeback in 2020?

Last year was a landmark for online privacy in many ways, with something of a consensus emerging that consumers deserve protection from the companies that sell their attention and behavior for profit.

The debate now is largely around how to regulate platforms, not whether it needs to happen. The consensus among key legislators acknowledges that privacy is not just of benefit to individuals but can be likened to public health; a level of protection afforded to each of us helps inoculate democratic societies from manipulation by vested and vicious interests.

Full article: Will online privacy make a comeback in 2020? | TechCrunch

Lawmakers push bipartisan update to children’s online privacy law

House lawmakers are introducing a bipartisan bill Thursday to update a long-standing children’s online privacy law so that parents could force companies to delete personal information collected about their kids.

The changes include allowing parents to delete personal information collected online about their kids. The legislation would also require parental consent before companies can collect personal data like names, addresses and selfies from children under 16 years old.

Source: Reps. Walberg and Rush push bipartisan update to children’s online privacy law – Axios

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