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Tag Archives for " right to be forgotten "

Swedish court rejects Google’s appeal in RTBF case

The Swedish Administrative Court of Stockholm confirmed Google violated the EU General Data Protection Regulation in several instances and rejected Google’s motion that Sweden’s data protection authority’s, Datainspektionen, decisions repealed due to formal deficiencies.

The court upheld the fine of SEK 50 million, while the court lowered the fine for one violation from SEK 25 million to 2 million. The fine was lowered because one complaint was partly dismissed and one instance was not considered a violation (since Google adhered to the injunction without undue delay).

Source: Swedish court rejects Google’s appeal in RTBF case

Belgian DPA imposes a €600,000 fine on Google Belgium for non-compliance with right to be forgotten

On 14 July 2020, the Belgian DPA imposed a fine of EUR600,000 on Google Belgium SA/NV (Google Belgium) for not respecting a Belgian resident’s right to be forgotten. This is the highest fine ever imposed by the Belgian DPA.

The complainant, an executive at an unnamed large company, had requested the removal of 12 URLs which he considered to be harmful to his reputation. These URLs concerned, on the one hand, search results regarding alleged links with a certain political party, and on the other hand, a harassment complaint declared unfounded in 2010. As Google had refused to remove several of the concerned links, the complainant referred the case to the Belgian DPA.

Source: Belgium: Belgian DPA imposes a EUR600,000 fine, its highest fine ever, on Google Belgium for non-compliance with right to be forgotten

A Princess Is Making Google Forget Her Drunken Rant About Killing Muslims

The removal of nearly 200 links from Google search in Germany about a princess’ drunken rampage in Scotland raises questions about who has the ‘right to be forgotten.’

In 2014, German princess Theodora Sayn-Wittgenstein, 27 at the time, attended the University of St Andrews’ charity Oktoberfest, got drunk, assaulted police officers and first responders, and said: “I was doing my nails this morning and wondered how many Muslims I could kill.” Her family, with the help of Google and Europe’s right to be forgotten law, have been trying to make that night disappear.

Source: A Princess Is Making Google Forget Her Drunken Rant About Killing Muslims

1 Google victory in German top court over right to be forgotten

A German court has sided with Google and rejected requests to wipe entries from search results. The cases hinged on whether the right to be forgotten outweighed the public’s right to know.

The court ruled that whether links to critical articles have to be removed from the search list always depends on a comprehensive consideration of fundamental rights in the individual case.

Source: Google victory in German top court over right to be forgotten | Germany| News and in-depth reporting from Berlin and beyond | DW | 27.07.2020

Court Tells Grandma To Delete Photos Of Grandkids On Facebook For Violating The GDPR

Dutch court has said that a grandmother must delete photos of her grandkids that she posted to Facebook and Pinterest, because it violates the GDPR.

A mother of three underage children (plaintiff) filed a claim in the Court to cease the posting of her children’s photos by their grandmother (defendant) on social media. The plaintiff argued that the defendant had not obtained a consent from her or her ex-partner – the legal representatives of one of the children concerned.

Source: Court Tells Grandma To Delete Photos Of Grandkids On Facebook For Violating The GDPR | Above the Law

Google’s Right-to-Be-Forgotten Fine Toppled by French Court

Google won a battle over the right to be forgotten after France’s top administrative court canceled a fine of 100,000 euros ($111,000) for failing to remove contentious search results globally.

France’s Council of State threw out the 2016 penalty, following guidance from the European Union’s highest court which last year backed the Alphabet Inc. unit by saying it should only scrub search results on European versions of its websites.

Source: Google’s Right-to-Be-Forgotten Fine Toppled by French Court – BNN Bloomberg

Iowa senator to introduce ‘right to be forgotten’ law

A state senator wants to spare Iowans the agony of search engines digging up past indiscretions they would rather forget, or at least keep hidden from public view.

Bill is designed to protect Iowans who post information online “and half a decade later decide to go back and clean up their social media space before they apply for a job or move into a new opportunity in life,” said senator.

Source: Bill gives Iowans chance to ‘forget’ bad tweets | The Gazette

Most Americans support the right to be forgotten online

Americans prefer to keep certain information about themselves outside the purview of online searches, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

74% of U.S. adults say it is more important to be able to “keep things about themselves from being searchable online,” while 23% say it is more important to be able to “discover potentially useful information about others.”

Source: Most Americans support the right to be forgotten online | Pew Research Center

German Constitutional Court Reshapes “Right to be Forgotten” and Expands Its Oversight of Human Rights Violations

In two recent landmark decisions issued on November 6, 2019, the German Constitutional Court presented its unique perspective on the “right to be forgotten” and announced that it will assume a greater role in safeguarding German residents’ fundamental rights from now on.

In first case the court held that since media nad privacy rights are not fully harmonized by EU law, the fundamental rights guaranteed by the German Basic Law (Grundgesetz) applied. The court stressed that in areas where the law is not fully harmonized, the application of fundamental rights granted by national constitutions can lead to different outcomes in the Member States.

In second case the court followed the Google Spain decision with respect to the general principles, in particular by confirming that the right at stake was the right to privacy. However, in the end, Google prevailed and the court did not order the takedown of the links at issue.

Full article: German Constitutional Court Reshapes “Right to be Forgotten” and Expands Its Oversight of Human Rights Violations

Google wins landmark right to be forgotten case

Europe’s top court has ruled that Google does not have to apply the right to be forgotten globally.

It means that firm only needs to remove references to articles and other material from its search results in Europe – and not elsewhere – after receiving an appropriate request.

The ruling stems from a dispute between Google and a French privacy regulator.

Source: Google wins landmark right to be forgotten case

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