Tag Archives for " right to be forgotten "

A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada?

Should Canada adopt its own version of the “right to be forgotten”? The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) recently concluded, in a Draft Position Paper, that such a right actually exists already.

According to the OPC, Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) gives individuals legal power to make search engines like Google de-list search results about them, and to make individual websites take down information.

Source: A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada? | Center for Internet and Society

A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada?

Should Canada adopt its own version of the “right to be forgotten”? The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) recently concluded, in a Draft Position Paper, that such a right actually exists already.

According to the OPC, Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) gives individuals legal power to make search engines like Google de-list search results about them, and to make individual websites take down information.

Source: A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada? | Center for Internet and Society

B.C. Court Leaves Google Global Takedown Order Intact Pending Full Trial

A British Columbia court has denied Google’s request to vary an injunction requiring it to remove search results from its global index, concluding that a U.S. ruling that did not demonstrate that the removal would result in a violation of U.S. law.

Source: B.C. Court Leaves Google Global Takedown Order Intact Pending Full Trial

How does California’s Erasure Law stack up against the EU’s right to be forgotten

While most are familiar with the European Union’s right to be forgotten, many fewer are aware that in 2015, California enacted the Online Eraser Law, which many are touting as the “Right To Be Forgotten Lite” as it allows minors to “erase” their content online.

But, is California’s law actually RTBF Lite? Here’s how it stacks up against the European Union’s right to be forgotten.

Source: How does California’s Erasure Law stack up against the EU’s right to be forgotten

Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case

A businessman has won his legal action to remove search results about a criminal conviction in a landmark “right to be forgotten” case that could have wide-ranging repercussions.

The ruling was made by Mr Justice Warby in London on Friday. The judge rejected a similar claim brought by a second businessman who was jailed for a more serious offence.

Source: Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case | Technology | The Guardian

How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps

Deleting your Google web browser history and Google Google search history is one way to limit how much data you allow to be collected about you on the internet. Even if you’re someone who already uses Google’s incognito web browser, you’re still not being kept completely anonymous online.

Believe it or not, there are other web browsers out there besides Google, they are just much less well-known. One example of a search engine that prioritizes user privacy is DuckDuckGo, which is essentially a Google that doesn’t track you online.

Source: How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps | Money

Right to be forgotten and employees

If employer receives a “right to be forgotten” request from an employee do he have to honor it?

Not necessarily. The GDPR indicates that people have a “right to be forgotten” in some situations, but that right is not absolute. Rather it only exists in the following six situations – many of which do not apply to personal data collected as part of an employment relationship.

Source: Bryan Cave – GDPR’s Most Frequently Asked Questions: If I receive a right to be forgotten request from an employee do I have to honor it?

Man who gave interviews about his crimes asks court to delete Google results

The Right to be Forgotten trial has heard arguments on whether a man who gave interviews about his criminal past should be able to have those reports, among others, deleted from Google Search.

“The claimant in this case is a businessman who more than a decade ago pleaded guilty to an offence of conspiracy to intercept communications in a business context,” his barrister, Hugh Tomlinson QC of Matrix Chambers, told London’s High Court yesterday morning, adding that his client “was sentenced to a short term of imprisonment”.

Source: Man who gave interviews about his crimes asks court to delete Google results • The Register

We can’t allow big tech companies thwart the ‘right to remember’

The European Union recently adopted laws embodying a proposed “right to be forgotten,” to protect individuals from eternal memorialization of unfortunate past indiscretions. However, I feel it’s time to propose a complementary “right to remember,” to ensure that history cannot be erased or rewritten at the whim of those who control the systems we use to communicate, plan, and lead our lives.

Recent court cases have shown that the largest, most powerful companies controlling the internet are willing to take extreme positions regarding their right to control data after it’s been made public. They abuse ambiguous, out-of-date US legislation such as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to threaten and punish companies that dare to collect data that is explicitly intended for public view. They also employ sophisticated software to thwart and discourage automated collection of data they deem undesirable.

Source: We can’t allow big tech companies thwart the ‘right to remember’

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