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Tag Archives for " security "

Italian police can now use drones to monitor people’s movements

Italy has said police may use drones to monitor movement in order to contain the coronavirus outbreak.

The National Civil Aviation Authority (ENAC) authorized the use of drones to monitor the movements of citizens in municipal areas to ensure the containment of the epidemiological emergency, ENAC said Monday in a letter published on its official website.

Source: March 24 coronavirus news – CNN

UK Home Office breached GDPR 100 times

The UK Home Office has breached European data protection regulations at least 100 times in its handling of the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS).

IDs have been lost, documents misplaced, passports have gone missing, and applicant information has been disclosed to third parties without permission in some of the cases, according to a new report.

Source: UK Home Office breached GDPR 100 times through botched management of EU Settlement Scheme | ZDNet

Chicago police using controversial Clearview AI facial recognition tool that taps photos from Facebook, other sites

The Chicago Police Department is using a controversial facial recognition tool that allows investigators to search an image of unknown suspects to see if it matches a database of three billion photos lifted from websites like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter — a technology privacy advocates say is so ripe for abuse that cops should stop using it immediately.

Critics say Clearview AI’s software is an invasive overreach because it grabs the photos without the consent of those pictured or even the websites that post them. But Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said facial recognition software like Clearview adds “jet fuel” to the department’s ability to identify and locate suspects.

Source: Clearview AI facial recognition: Chicago police using controversial tool that taps photos from Facebook, other sites – Chicago Sun-Times

€114 Million in Fines Imposed by EU Authorities Under GDPR

New findings from DLA Piper show that 160,000 data breach notifications reported across 28 European Union Member States and data protection authorities have imposed €114 million in monetary fines under the GDPR for a wide range of infringements. Not all fines were related to data breach infringements, however.

In terms of the total value of fines issued by geographical region, France (€51m), Germany (€24.5m) and Austria (€18m) topped the rankings, whilst the Netherlands (40,647), Germany (37,636) and the UK (22,181) had the highest number of data breaches notified to regulators.

Source: €114m in Fines Imposed by Euro Authorities Under GDPR – Infosecurity Magazine

Biometric systems to expand in airport security

Biometric Systems segment of the market is anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period, in terms of the role such technology plays in airport security.

Various airports and airlines are currently testing and using biometrics in the airports to speed up various airport processes like check-in and security check or passport control.

Source: #Privacy: Biometric systems to expand in airport security

Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away

Fujifilm is getting into surveillance cameras with the SX800, a long-range surveillance camera with a 40x optical zoom that’s designed to offer security at international borders and large commercial facilities.

Fujifilm says the SX800 will have a total equivalent focal length of 1000mm, which is enough to focus on a car’s license plate from 1km or roughly 0.6 miles away.

For everyone it’s a good reminder that just because you can’t see a security camera, that doesn’t mean one can’t see you, even if it’s multiple kilometers away.

Source: Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away – The Verge

China camera apps may open up user data to Beijing government requests

In the wake of growing global concerns over internet privacy and security protection, cybersecurity experts say Chinese companies cannot deny the government if asked for data.

China’s mobile programs count hundreds of millions of active users, but their capacity to ensure privacy remains a matter of debate — especially since there’s less of an emphasis on that factor at home.

Source: China camera apps may open up user data to Beijing government requests

Soon, satellites will be able to watch you everywhere all the time

Every year, commercially available satellite images are becoming sharper and taken more frequently.

Privacy advocates warn that innovation in satellite imagery is outpacing the US government’s (to say nothing of the rest of the world’s) ability to regulate the technology. Unless we impose stricter limits now, they say, one day everyone from ad companies to suspicious spouses to terrorist organizations will have access to tools previously reserved for government spy agencies. Which would mean that at any given moment, anyone could be watching anyone else.

Full article: Soon, satellites will be able to watch you everywhere all the time – MIT Technology Review

FaceApp Reveals Huge Holes in Today’s Privacy Laws

Cameras are everywhere, and data brokers are vacuuming up information on individuals. But regulations have not kept pace.

Facial recognition is only the tip of the iceberg. License-plate readers, shopping beacons, and a whole suite of mobile trackers follow individuals both online and offline.

Facial recognition is only the tip of the iceberg. License-plate readers, shopping beacons, and a whole suite of mobile trackers follow individuals both online and offline.

Full article: FaceApp Reveals Huge Holes in Today’s Privacy Laws – The Atlantic

The Netherlands imposes first GDPR fine of EUR 460,000

The Dutch Data Protection Authority – Autoriteit Persoonsgegevens – has issued its first GDPR-fine of EUR 460,000. The fine is imposed on the Dutch Haga Hospital for having an insufficient internal security of patient records.

The hospital did not have in place two-factor authentication, which should have been the case when it comes to patient records. Also, while the hospital did control its logs (by a random check of six patient records per year), that this wasn’t sufficient to meet the requirement of ‘systematic, risk-oriented or intelligent control’, in particular considering the scale of data processing by the hospital.

Source: The Netherlands – First GDPR fine imposed: EUR 460,000

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