Tag Archives for " security "

Implementing appropriate security under the GDPR

Security of processing is a foundational principle of the GDPR. Under Article 5(1)(f), personal data shall be “processed in a manner that ensures appropriate security of the personal data, including protection against unauthorised or unlawful processing and against accidental loss, destruction or damage, using appropriate technical or organisational measures (‘integrity and confidentiality’).”

Read full article: Implementing appropriate security under the GDPR

London cops’ facial recognition doesn’t work

London cops’ facial recognition kit has only correctly identified two people to date – neither of whom were criminals – and the UK capital’s police force has made no arrests using it. Police’s automated facial recognition (AFR) technology has a 98 per cent false positive rate.

Source: Zero arrests, 2 correct matches, no criminals: London cops’ facial recog tech slammed • The Register

Why a DNA data breach is much worse than a credit card leak

Why would hackers want DNA information specifically? And what are the implications of a big DNA breach? One simple reason is that hackers might want to sell DNA data back for ransom. Or hackers could threaten to revoke access or post the sensitive information online if not given money.  But there are reasons genetic data specifically could be lucrative.

“This data could be sold on the down-low or monetized to insurance companies. You can imagine the consequences: One day, I might apply for a long-term loan and get rejected because deep in the corporate system, there is data that I am very likely to get Alzheimer’s and die before I would repay the loan.”

Source: Why a DNA data breach is much worse than a credit card leak – The Verge

Facial recognition system had 7 percent hit rate at 2017 Champions League Final

NEC system trialled at UEFA Champions League Final by South Wales Police produced almost 2,300 false positives.

South Wales Police said the high number of false positives at the Cardiff final was due to poor quality images supplied by UEFA, Interpol, and other agencies; an old NEC algorithm; and it being the first major deployment.

Source: Facial recognition system had 7 percent hit rate at 2017 Champions League Final | ZDNet

How Countries “Outsource” Electronic Surveillance And Threaten Privacy

Intelligence sharing partnerships are “completely shrouded in secrecy, making it impossible to know how much data is being shared.”

Depending on the countries’ specific intelligence sharing arrangements, most anything can be shared, says Edin Omanovic, Privacy International’s State Surveillance Programme Lead. The system’s trove includes information like raw internet and phone data, intelligence reports about individuals, watchlists, information about intelligence gathering techniques, information about encryption and decryption techniques, and more.

Source: How Countries “Outsource” Electronic Surveillance And Threaten Privacy

EU Commission sets new rules for whistleblower protection

Recent scandals such as Dieselgate, Luxleaks, the Panama Papers or the ongoing Cambridge Analytica revelations show that whistleblowers can play an important role in uncovering unlawful activities that damage the public interest and the welfare of our citizens and society.

Commissionss proposal will guarantee a high level of protection for whistleblowers who report breaches of EU law by setting new, EU-wide standards. The new law will establish safe channels for reporting both within an organisation and to public authorities. It will also protect whistleblowers against dismissal, demotion and other forms of retaliation and require national authorities to inform citizens and provide training for public authorities on how to deal with whistleblowers.

Source: European Commission – PRESS RELEASES – Press release – Whistleblower protection: Commission sets new, EU-wide rules

Singapore to Test Facial Recognition on Lampposts, Stoking Privacy Fears

In the not too distant future, surveillance cameras sitting atop over 100,000 lampposts in Singapore could help authorities pick out and recognize faces in crowds across the island-state.

The plan to install the cameras, which will be linked to facial recognition software, is raising privacy fears among security experts and rights groups. The government said the system would allow it to “perform crowd analytics” and support anti-terror operations.

Source: Singapore to Test Facial Recognition on Lampposts, Stoking Privacy Fears | World News | US News

New Zealand police eyeing up newer, smarter CCTV facial recognition technology

Cops look to upgrade their CCTV surveillance technology, sparking calls for a privacy debate.

With a network of CCTV cameras across the country, it would give criminals fewer places to hide. Also in the high-tech system would be suspects, prisoners, firearms licence details, missing people and those on the child sex offender register.

Source: Police eyeing up newer, smarter CCTV facial recognition technology | Stuff.co.nz

Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime

Citizens may object to their social media mining by law enforcement, but the practice can keep the public safe.

Police departments should continue to monitor social media to inform law enforcement. After all, social media sites are full of data that can make police interventions more effective, from posts about crimes in progress to damning evidence offered freely by criminals and even live videos of crimes. However, in designing these initiatives, police departments need to pay closer attention to the Constitution as well as the needs of citizens.

Source: Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime | WIRED

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