fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " security "

€114 Million in Fines Imposed by EU Authorities Under GDPR

New findings from DLA Piper show that 160,000 data breach notifications reported across 28 European Union Member States and data protection authorities have imposed €114 million in monetary fines under the GDPR for a wide range of infringements. Not all fines were related to data breach infringements, however.

In terms of the total value of fines issued by geographical region, France (€51m), Germany (€24.5m) and Austria (€18m) topped the rankings, whilst the Netherlands (40,647), Germany (37,636) and the UK (22,181) had the highest number of data breaches notified to regulators.

Source: €114m in Fines Imposed by Euro Authorities Under GDPR – Infosecurity Magazine

Biometric systems to expand in airport security

Biometric Systems segment of the market is anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period, in terms of the role such technology plays in airport security.

Various airports and airlines are currently testing and using biometrics in the airports to speed up various airport processes like check-in and security check or passport control.

Source: #Privacy: Biometric systems to expand in airport security

Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away

Fujifilm is getting into surveillance cameras with the SX800, a long-range surveillance camera with a 40x optical zoom that’s designed to offer security at international borders and large commercial facilities.

Fujifilm says the SX800 will have a total equivalent focal length of 1000mm, which is enough to focus on a car’s license plate from 1km or roughly 0.6 miles away.

For everyone it’s a good reminder that just because you can’t see a security camera, that doesn’t mean one can’t see you, even if it’s multiple kilometers away.

Source: Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away – The Verge

China camera apps may open up user data to Beijing government requests

In the wake of growing global concerns over internet privacy and security protection, cybersecurity experts say Chinese companies cannot deny the government if asked for data.

China’s mobile programs count hundreds of millions of active users, but their capacity to ensure privacy remains a matter of debate — especially since there’s less of an emphasis on that factor at home.

Source: China camera apps may open up user data to Beijing government requests

Soon, satellites will be able to watch you everywhere all the time

Every year, commercially available satellite images are becoming sharper and taken more frequently.

Privacy advocates warn that innovation in satellite imagery is outpacing the US government’s (to say nothing of the rest of the world’s) ability to regulate the technology. Unless we impose stricter limits now, they say, one day everyone from ad companies to suspicious spouses to terrorist organizations will have access to tools previously reserved for government spy agencies. Which would mean that at any given moment, anyone could be watching anyone else.

Full article: Soon, satellites will be able to watch you everywhere all the time – MIT Technology Review

FaceApp Reveals Huge Holes in Today’s Privacy Laws

Cameras are everywhere, and data brokers are vacuuming up information on individuals. But regulations have not kept pace.

Facial recognition is only the tip of the iceberg. License-plate readers, shopping beacons, and a whole suite of mobile trackers follow individuals both online and offline.

Facial recognition is only the tip of the iceberg. License-plate readers, shopping beacons, and a whole suite of mobile trackers follow individuals both online and offline.

Full article: FaceApp Reveals Huge Holes in Today’s Privacy Laws – The Atlantic

The Netherlands imposes first GDPR fine of EUR 460,000

The Dutch Data Protection Authority – Autoriteit Persoonsgegevens – has issued its first GDPR-fine of EUR 460,000. The fine is imposed on the Dutch Haga Hospital for having an insufficient internal security of patient records.

The hospital did not have in place two-factor authentication, which should have been the case when it comes to patient records. Also, while the hospital did control its logs (by a random check of six patient records per year), that this wasn’t sufficient to meet the requirement of ‘systematic, risk-oriented or intelligent control’, in particular considering the scale of data processing by the hospital.

Source: The Netherlands – First GDPR fine imposed: EUR 460,000

With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been

There are hundreds of stores using facial recognition – none that have any rules or standards to prevent abuse.

With facial recognition, getting caught in one store could mean a digital record of your face is shared across the country. Stores are already using the technology for security purposes and can share that data – meaning that if one store considers you a threat, every business in that network could come to the same conclusion. One mistake could mean never being able to shop again.

Full article: With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been – CNET

A New Age of Warfare: How Internet Mercenaries Do Battle for Authoritarian Governments

Sophisticated surveillance, once the domain of world powers, is increasingly available on the private market. Smaller countries are seizing on the tools — sometimes for darker purposes.

NSO, a private company based in Herzliya, Israel, has hired former government hackers to ply their trades for foreign governments.

Full article: A New Age of Warfare: How Internet Mercenaries Do Battle for Authoritarian Governments – The New York Times

How Taylor Swift showed us the scary future of facial recognition

Surveillance at concerts is just the beginning, as fears grow around an unregulated, billion-dollar industry.

Taylor Swift raised eyebrows late last year when Rolling Stone magazine revealed her security team had deployed facial recognition recognition technology during her Reputation tour to root out stalkers. But the company contracted for the efforts uses its technology to provide much more than just security. ISM Connect also uses its smart screens to capture metrics for promotion and marketing.

Full article: How Taylor Swift showed us the scary future of facial recognition

1 2 3 23
>