Tag Archives for " social media "

Snooping Amsterdam civil servants broke privacy laws with Facebook research 

An analysis of the Facebook networks of trouble-making youngsters by the Amsterdam city authorities constituted a breach of privacy and should have been reported to privacy monitoring body AP.

Amsterdam civil servants decided to build up a picture of the networks of youngsters who hung around on the streets and caused a nuisance in Amsterdam Zuid. By looking at their networks the authorities thought they would gain a better understanding of this group.

Source: Snooping Amsterdam civil servants broke privacy laws with Facebook research – DutchNews.nl

From Cambridge Analytica to GDPR: Enter digital supply chain management

Together with the GDPR’s elaborate requirements for transparency, due diligence, risk analyses, documentation and security, this rude awakening should create a perfect storm.

It can incentivize organizations to understand, prioritize and deploy digital supply chain management to ensure the sources of their data are wholesome, their vendors resilient and their customers accountable for their actions. It can channel budgets to chief privacy officers, pave their path to senior management and boards, and empower them to weigh in on product engineering and design choices at an early stage.

Source: From Cambridge Analytica to GDPR: Enter digital supply chain management

Facebook to introduce Clear History privacy tool in coming months

It’s like clearing your web browser history, but this time for Facebook’s wealth of data on your interactions.

Facebook has announced numerous steps in recent weeks — directed at both everyday users and developers — meant to prevent third parties from gleaning an abundance of personal data from unknowing users.

Source: Facebook to introduce Clear History privacy tool in coming months – The Verge

When Online Dating Met Facebook

At this week’s Facebook Developer Conference, or F8, the social network company announced that it will begin introducing online dating features onto its platform. A dating feature is a logical next step for a company focused on leveraging data to connect people.

Facebook’s plans are especially intriguing because it effectively merges traditional dating with technology. Facebook can harness social signals used in offline dating – mutual friends, family connections, or school, work, and church networks – while also providing would-be daters the same frictionless experience and abundance of potential choices that characterize the online dating ecosystem.

Source: When Online Dating Met Facebook

Americans don’t trust tech companies on data privacy

Americans have finally started to lose faith in tech companies’ ability to protect their information, according to a survey fielded by HarrisX, a research consultancy, within 24 hours of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony before Congress.

58% of respondnets believe regulation of Facebook and other social media companies is inevitable.

Source: Americans don’t trust tech companies on data privacy – Axios

Data firm leaks 48 million user profiles it scraped from Facebook, LinkedIn, others

A little-known data firm was able to build 48 million personal profiles, combining data from sites and social networks like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Zillow, among others — without the users’ knowledge or consent.

Localblox, a Bellevue, Wash.-based firm, says it “automatically crawls, discovers, extracts, indexes, maps and augments data in a variety of formats from the web and from exchange networks.” Since its founding in 2010, the company has focused its collection on publicly accessible data sources, like social networks Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and real estate site Zillow to name a few, to produce profiles.

Source: Data firm leaks 48 million user profiles it scraped from Facebook, LinkedIn, others | ZDNet

Competition Is at the Heart of Facebook’s Privacy Problem

Opinion: Until consumers can easily control their data, competitors to Facebook won’t thrive.

Consumers are trusting companies with vast amounts of intimate data and receiving very little assurance that it will be properly handled and secured. In turn, our data are used to power the connected services we use, and depending on the platform or app, are sold to advertisers. Sometimes, as in the case of Facebook, we receive services for free in exchange for our data.

Source: Competition Is at the Heart of Facebook’s Privacy Problem | WIRED

Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime

Citizens may object to their social media mining by law enforcement, but the practice can keep the public safe.

Police departments should continue to monitor social media to inform law enforcement. After all, social media sites are full of data that can make police interventions more effective, from posts about crimes in progress to damning evidence offered freely by criminals and even live videos of crimes. However, in designing these initiatives, police departments need to pay closer attention to the Constitution as well as the needs of citizens.

Source: Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime | WIRED

Denmark considers ‘data ethics council’ in wake of Facebook scandal

Minister for employment Troels Lund Poulsen has backed suggestions that an ethics council for the use of data could be established by the Danish state.

The idea has been raised by environmentalist party Alternative, which has proposed that areas such as privacy, data protection, artificial intelligence and data laws could come under the remit of the ethics council.

A similar ethics body, the Danish Council of Ethics (Det Etiske Råd), already exists for healthcare matters.

Source: Denmark considers ‘data ethics council’ in wake of Facebook scandal – The Local

EU privacy watchdogs to look into harvesting of data from social media

European Union privacy watchdogs will look deeper into the harvesting of personal data from social networks for economic or political purposes following the scandal engulfing Facebook Inc. after data from nearly 87 million users was improperly accessed.

“A multi-billion dollar social media platform saying it is sorry simply is not enough,” Andrea Jelinek, chair of the group of EU data protection authorities, said in a statement on Thursday.

Source: EU privacy watchdogs to look into harvesting of data from social media

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