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Tag Archives for " study "

Study Shows Consumers Don’t Understand How Their Data Is Used

The ad industry continues to roll out new protocols around online data and consumer privacy. LoopMe surveyed consumers to find out if they’re really aware of the changes, and what they thought.

As it shows, consumers do not believe their online data is secure and don’t understand how it is used.

  • 58% of U.S. consumers do not believe their online data is more secure than it was a year ago, compared with one in two UK consumers.
  • 15% have a clear understanding around how companies use their online data for advertising, compared with 18% in the UK.
  • 34% do not read website cookie and privacy policies before continuing with content browsing or video viewing, compared with 48% in the UK.

Full article: Study Shows What Consumers Understand About Changing Ad Preferences, Data Regulations 03/31/2021

Study warns deepfakes can fool facial recognition

In a paper published on the preprint server Arxiv.org, researchers at Sungkyunkwan University in Suwon, South Korea demonstrate that APIs from Microsoft and Amazon can be fooled with commonly used deepfake-generating methods. In one case, one of the APIs — Microsoft’s Azure Cognitive Services — was fooled by up to 78% of the deepfakes the coauthors fed it.

“From experiments, we find that some deepfake generation methods are of greater threat to recognition systems than others and that each system reacts to deepfake impersonation attacks differently,” the researchers wrote.

Source: Study warns deepfakes can fool facial recognition | VentureBeat

9 scary revelations from 40 years of facial recognition research

In science fiction, facial recognition technology is a hallmark of a dystopian society. The truth of how it was created, and how it’s used today, is just as freaky.

In a new study, researchers conduct a historical survey of over 100 data sets used to train facial recognition systems compiled over the last 43 years. The broadest revelation is that, as the need for more data (i.e. photos) increased, researchers stopped bothering to ask for the consent of the people in the photos they used as data.

Full article: 9 scary revelations from 40 years of facial recognition research

45% of Americans have had their personal information exposed in a data breach

There has been a 48% increase in fraud attacks hitting mobile devices, and 36% growth YoY in bot volume targeting financial institutions, according to Fraud Trends to Watch in 2021, a study by LexisNexis Risk Solutions.

Over 4,500 data breaches have been made public since 2005, and 45% of Americans have had their personal information exposed in a data breach in the last five years.

Source: Mobile Fraud And Bots Peak During Economic Slowdown: Study 02/05/2021

2 in 3 US Consumers Don’t Care Whether Or Not Their Devices are Recording All the Time

While most major smart home devices and smartphones explicitly state they are not always listening, many consumers express a lack of concern. The Safety.com research team conducted a survey of 1,091 U.S. residents, asking them if they cared whether their smart home devices were always listening.

Study found that:

  • 66.7% of people responded that they don’t care whether their home devices are always listening.
  • Women are more concerned about their smart devices listening than men by a margin of over 7%.
  • Millennials and Gen Z age brackets are far less concerned about smart devices listening to them all the time than people in the Baby Boomer age bracket. Gen X is evenly spread.
  • Regionality played a small part in respondents’ beliefs. People located in more tech-dominant cities and areas are less concerned about smart devices listening than people in less tech-dominant cities and areas by approximately 6-10% depending on the location.

Source: 66.7% of U.S. Consumers Don’t Care Whether Or Not Their Smart Home Devices are Recording All the Time | Safety.com

Menstruation apps store excessive information

Menstruation apps are unnecessarily storing personal data such as what medication women are on, their birth control habits and how hard women find it to reach orgasm, privacy campaigners have said.

A study of five leading apps by Privacy International, a UK-based charity, found that companies held intimate information on users including answers to questions about when they have yeast infections and how often they have sex or see a gynaecologist.

Full article: Menstruation apps store excessive information, privacy charity says | Menstruation | The Guardian

Researchers Explore Privacy Techniques to Protect Against Re-Identification of Genomic Information

It’s the stuff of science fiction: adversaries extract DNA information from a cup of coffee or postage stamp and use it infer one’s most private traits.

However, a recently released study entitled, “Data Sanitization to Reduce Private Information Leakage from Functional Genomics” discusses how this can be achieved, along with privacy measures that the life sciences and research community can use to help limit the risks to identifiable health information.

Source: Researchers Explore Privacy Techniques to Protect Against Re-Identification of Genomic Information

Researchers Find ‘Anonymized’ Data Is Even Less Anonymous Than We Thought

Corporations love to pretend that ‘anonymization’ of the data they collect protects consumers. Studies keep showing that’s not really true.

When it was revealed that Avast is using its popular antivirus software to collect and sell user data, Avast CEO Ondrej Vlcek first downplayed the scandal, assuring the public the collected data had been “anonymized”—or stripped of any obvious identifiers like names or phone numbers.

But analysis from students at Harvard University shows that anonymization isn’t the magic bullet companies like to pretend it is. Previous studies have shown that even within independent individual anonymized datasets, identifying users isn’t all that difficult. But when data from different leaks are combined, identifying actual users isn’t all that difficult.

Source: Researchers Find ‘Anonymized’ Data Is Even Less Anonymous Than We Thought – VICE

GDPR Subverted by Cookie Consent Tools

New study suggests that many websites are navigating around GDPR by tailoring the design of their cookie consent tools and using dark patterns to provide a misleading veneer of a consent agreement.

According to the researchers, the study illustrates “the extent to which illegal practices prevail, with vendors of CMPs turning a blind eye to — or worse, incentivising — clearly illegal configurations of their systems.”

Source: GDPR Subverted by Cookie Consent Tools, Study Reveals – CPO Magazine

Privacy investments get positive ROI

Cisco’s 2020 data privacy benchmark study provide strong evidence that privacy has become an attractive investment even beyond any compliance requirements. Organizations that get privacy right improve their customer relationships, operational efficiency, and bottom-line results.

The data in this report is derived from the Cisco Annual Cybersecurity Benchmark Study, a double-blind survey of 2800 security professionals in 13 countries. Survey respondents represent all major industries and a mix of company sizes.

Source: From Privacy to Profit: Achieving Positive Returns on Privacy Investments

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