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Tag Archives for " tracking "

Facebook and Google have ad trackers on your streaming TV

Modern TV, coming to you over the Internet instead of through cable or over the air, has a modern problem: all of your Internet-connected streaming devices are watching you back and feeding your data to advertisers. Two independent sets of researchers this week released papers that measure the extent of the surveillance your TV is conducting on you.

The first study, conducted by researchers at Princeton and the University of Chicago, looked specifically at Roku and Amazon set-top devices. A review of more than 2,000 channels across the two platforms found trackers on 69% of Roku channels and 89% of Amazon Fire TV channels.

Source: Facebook and Google have ad trackers on your streaming TV, studies find | Ars Technica

Bavarian DPA investigates Blood Donation Service for website tracking

The Bavarian Data Protection Authority (BayLDA) is currently scrutinising the website of the blood donation service of the Bavarian Red Cross as part of a focused data protection review.

The reason for this was the use of tracking tools on the website of the blood donation service. In particular, the BayLDA will look at whether sensitive data about the users’ health has been used by Facebook.

If tracking tools are used, quite a number of data protection requirements must be observed. This is not as simple as merely informing the user about the tracking tools in simple terms; the website operator must also ensure that they legally integrate the tracking tools, i.e. that a legal basis allows the integration or that the users have given their consent in advance.

Source: Blood Donation Service under high scrutiny

Browser Fingerprinting: An Introduction and the Challenges Ahead

In the past few years, a technique called browser fingerprinting has received a lot of attention because of the risks it can pose to privacy.

What is it? How is it used? What is Tor Browser doing against it?

In this blog post is answer to these questions: Browser Fingerprinting: An Introduction and the Challenges Ahead | Tor Blog

UK watchdogs voice concern over lip-reading CCTV

The UK Surveillance Camera Commissioner, Tony Porter, has warned that in the future, citizens may have to hide their conversations from CCTV until regulations are put in place for intrusive technologies.

Additionally Porter raised concerns about new technologies which could identify citizens by their walk, as well as lip-syncing technology that could decipher what individuals are saying from a distance.

Source: #privacy: UK watchdogs voice concern over lip-reading CCTV

Google proposes new privacy and anti-fingerprinting controls for the web

Google has announced a new long-term initiative that, if fully realized, will make it harder for online marketers and advertisers to track you across the web.

This new proposal follows the company’s plans to change how cookies in Chrome work and to make it easier for users to block tracking cookies.

Today’s proposal for a new open standard extends this by looking at how Chrome can close the loopholes that the digital advertising ecosystem can use to circumvent that. And soon, that may mean that your browser will feature new options that give you more control over how much you share without losing your anonymity.

Source: Google proposes new privacy and anti-fingerprinting controls for the web | TechCrunch

Facebook’s New Tool Lets You See Which Apps and Websites Tracked You 

The tool is a response to criticism that Facebook has faced over how it safeguards its users’ privacy.

The company introduced a new tool that lets people better see and control the information that Facebook has gathered about their browsing habits outside the social network.

The tool, Off-Facebook Activity, allows users to view the hundreds of sites and apps that share data and customer information with Facebook. They can disconnect the data from their account if they want.

Source: Facebook’s New Tool Lets You See Which Apps and Websites Tracked You – The New York Times

Cathay Pacific reveals its use of onboard cameras

Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific reveals its use of cameras on its aircraft, reopening an uncomfortable debate over surveillance aboard airplanes.

While CCTV surveillance is accepted by many as a reassuring security measure, others feel tracking passengers in the confines of an airplane cabin is a step too far.

Full article: Cathay Pacific reveals its use of onboard cameras | CNN Travel

Pentagon testing mass surveillance balloons across the US

The Pentagon has 25 mass surveillance balloons that can monitor and track individual vehicles as they travel across states.

The point of the balloons is “to provide a persistent surveillance system to locate and deter narcotic trafficking and homeland security threats”. But that also means everyday people will be subjected to sweeping government surveillance — without their knowledge or consent.

Source: Pentagon testing mass surveillance balloons across the US | US news | The Guardian

Publishers v. Privacy: Registration Is Coming

The introduction of ad blocking, browser-level advertising and browser-blocking of tracking and cookies should have heralded the beginning of more anonymous browsing.

Instead, these innovations may lead to more user registration and tracking, albeit in a potentially more consent-based manner. Publishers will soon be waging a greater battle with privacy to build a sustainable ad-supported business, writes, Ka Mo Lau, COO of Thunder Experience Cloud.

Full article: Publishers v. Privacy – Registration Is Coming | MarTech Advisor

Appeal against government mass surveillance loses in High Court

The human rights group Liberty has failed in its legal bid to put an end to the Investigatory Powers Act.

The law permits mass monitoring of connected devices to enable intelligence agencies to extend surveillance and government knowledge. But the legislation, branded the “Snoopers’ Charter” by its detractors has come under heavy criticism.

Source: Appeal against government mass surveillance loses in High Court

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