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Tag Archives for " tracking "

The state of tracking and data privacy in 2020

January 2020 felt like a turning point. CCPA went into effect, Google Chrome became the latest browser to commit to a cookie-less future and, after months of analytics folks sounding the alarm, digital marketers sobered to a vision of the future that looks quite different than today.

Here’s where search marketers find themselves in the current entanglement of data and privacy and where we can expect it to go from here.

Read full article: The state of tracking and data privacy in 2020 – Marketing Land

Mobile Device IDs Will Be The Next Ad Tracker To Bite The Dust

Neither Apple nor Google – which is fresh off announcing its plan to kill third-party cookies in Chrome less than two years from now – has taken concrete steps to eliminate their respective device IDs as of yet, but the app ecosystem should be preparing for that eventuality.

Device IDs have proven not to be the privacy-preserving solutions they were meant to be, and now it’s time for another change.

Read full article: Mobile Device IDs Will Be The Next Ad Tracker To Bite The Dust

Google tells facial recognition startup Clearview AI to stop scraping photos

Following Twitter, Google and YouTube have become the latest companies to send a cease-and-desist letter to Clearview AI, the startup behind a controversial facial recognition program that more than 600 police departments across North American use.

Google has demanded Clearview stop scraping YouTube videos for its database, as well as delete any photos it has already collected. “Clearview secretly collected image data of individuals without their consent, and in violation of rules explicitly forbidding them from doing so,” Google said.

Source: Google tells facial recognition startup Clearview AI to stop scraping photos | Engadget

Welfare surveillance system violates human rights, Dutch court rules 

A Dutch court has ordered the immediate halt of an automated surveillance system for detecting welfare fraud because it violates human rights, in a judgment likely to resonate well beyond the Netherlands.

The case was seen as an important legal challenge to the controversial but growing use by governments around the world of artificial intelligence (AI) and risk modelling in administering welfare benefits and other core services.

Source: Welfare surveillance system violates human rights, Dutch court rules | Technology | The Guardian

Teens have figured out how to mess with Instagram’s tracking algorithm

Teenagers are using group accounts to flood Instagram with random user data that can’t be tied to a single person. If you wanted to confuse Instagram, here’s how.

First, make multiple accounts. You might have an Instagram account dedicated to you and friends, or another just for your hobby. Give access to one of these low-risk accounts to someone you trust.

Then request a password reset, and send the link to that trusted friend who’ll log on from a different device. Password resets don’t end Instagram sessions, so both you and the second person will be able to access the same account at the same time.

Finally, by having someone else post the photo, Instagram grabs metadata from a new, fresh device. Repeat this process with a network of, say, 20 users in 20 different locations with 20 different devices? Now you’re giving Instagram quite the confusing cocktail of data.

Source: Teens have figured out how to mess with Instagram’s tracking algorithm – CNET

Hiding in plain sight: activists don camouflage to beat Met surveillance

Privacy campaigners bid to beat police facial recognition plans by wearing ‘dazzle’ makeup. Wearing makeup has long been seen as an act of defiance, from teenagers to New Romantics. Now that defiance has taken on a harder edge, as growing numbers of people use it to try to trick facial recognition systems.

Unlike fingerprinting and DNA testing, there are few restrictions on how police can use the new technology. And some of those who are concerned have decided to assert their right not to be put under surveillance with the perhaps unlikely weapon of makeup.

Source: Hiding in plain sight: activists don camouflage to beat Met surveillance | World news | The Guardian

Grindr and OKCupid Sell Your Data, but Twitter’s MoPub Is the Real Problem

On January 15, a Norweigian Consumer Council (NCC) investigative report exposed the ways that Grindr, OKCupid, and eight other apps are collecting and sharing extremely sensitive personal data.

A third-party advertising company called MoPub, owned by Twitter, was responsible for much of the technology that Grindr used to collect and share data. MoPub operates in the vast, convoluted, opaque ecosystem of personal data collection and sharing that powers modern adtech.

Source: Grindr and OKCupid Sell Your Data, but Twitter’s MoPub Is the Real Problem | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Facebook’s new privacy tool lets you manage how you’re tracked across the web

Mark Zuckerberg’s long-promised “Clear History” button is finally launched globally.

Facebook has been determined to give people privacy controls while they’re on the social network. On Tuesday, it rolled out a long-promised tool designed to give them control beyond the social network.

While it had slow rollouts around the world, starting last August, it should be available now to the 2.4 billion people who use Facebook every month, Zuckerberg said.

Source: Facebook’s new privacy tool lets you manage how you’re tracked across the web – CNET

Leaked Documents Expose the Secretive Market for Your Web Browsing Data

An Avast antivirus subsidiary sells ‘Every search. Every click. Every buy. On every site.’ Its clients have included Home Depot, Google, Microsoft, Pepsi, and McKinsey.

The documents show that the Avast antivirus program installed on a person’s computer collects data, and that its subsidiary Jumpshot repackages it into various different products that are then sold to many of the largest companies in the world.

Some clients paid millions of dollars for products that include a so-called “All Clicks Feed,” which can track user behavior, clicks, and movement across websites in highly precise detail.

Source: Leaked Documents Expose the Secretive Market for Your Web Browsing Data – VICE

London police to deploy live facial recognition cameras

The Metropolitan police has announced that it will begin the operational use of Live Facial Recognition (LFR) technology.

The cameras will be linked to a database of suspects, to which if the system detects someone an alert is generated, and ff the system detects someone who is not on the database their information will not be saved.

Source: #Privacy: Metropolitan police to deploy facial recognition cameras

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