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Tag Archives for " tracking "

Palantir Manual Shows How Law Enforcement Tracks Families

Palantir’s surveillance software has become a backbone of US law enforcement, particularly Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Palantir’s secret user manuals for law enforcement shows that with just the name of a person, law enforcement can use Palantir’s software to map that target’s family relationships, get their Social Security number, address, phone number, height, weight, and eye color. Add a license plate number, and Palantir’s system can often allow law enforcement to track where people have been during any period of time.

Source: Palantir Manual Shows How Law Enforcement Tracks Families | WIRED

New tool helps travelers avoid airlines that use facial recognition technology

A new tool launched by privacy activists offers to help travelers avoid increasingly invasive facial recognition technologies in airports.

Activist groups Fight for the Future, Demand Progress and Credo on Wednesday unveiled a new website called AirlinePrivacy.com, which shows users what airlines use facial recognition to verify the identity of passengers before boarding. The site also helps customers to directly book flights with airlines that don’t use facial recognition technologies.

Source: New tool helps travelers avoid airlines that use facial recognition technology

One Year Into GDPR, Most Apps Still Harvest Data Without Permission

Unauthorized data harvesting from mobile apps has continued nearly unabated in the year since Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation came into force last May.

In a recent test conducted for AdExchanger, mobile analytics company Kochava examined the behavior of the top 2,700 apps in the Google Play store in the United States compared with France, where GDPR applies.

Source: One Year Into GDPR, Most Apps Still Harvest Data Without Permission | AdExchanger

Coming to store shelves: cameras that guess your age and sex

Eyeing that can of soda in the supermarket cooler? Or maybe you’re craving a pint of ice cream? A camera could be watching you.

But it’s not there to see if you’re stealing. These cameras want to get to know you and what you’re buying.

It’s a new technology being trotted out to retailers, where cameras try to guess your age, gender or mood as you walk by. The intent is to use the information to show you targeted real-time ads on in-store video screens.

Full article: Coming to store shelves: cameras that guess your age and sex

International Privacy Experts Adopt Recommendations for AI, Location Tracking

The International Working Group on Data Protection has adopted new recommendations for artificial intelligence and location tracking.

The Berlin-based Working Group includes data protection authorities who assess emerging privacy challenges. The IWG report “Privacy and Artificial Intelligence” sets out fairness and respect for human rights, oversight, transparency and intelligibility as key elements of AI design and use.

Source: International Privacy Experts Adopt Recommendations for AI, Location Tracking

Human Rights Watch Reverse-Engineers Mass Surveillance App used by Police in Xinjiang

For years, Xinjiang has been a testbed for the Chinese government’s novel digital and physical surveillance tactics, as well as human rights abuses. But there is still a lot that the international human rights community doesn’t know, especially when it comes to post-2016 Xinjiang.

Last Wednesday, Human Rights Watch released a report detailing the inner workings of a mass surveillance app used by police and other officials. The application is used by offiicals to communicate with the larger Integrated Joint Operations Platform (IJOP), the umbrella system for collecting mass surveillance data in Xinjiang.

Full article: Human Rights Watch Reverse-Engineers Mass Surveillance App used by Police in Xinjiang

Reported Google browser change could be final death blow to cookies

Google is planning to announce new tools for Chrome that offer users more control over third party tracking cookies. The controls and default settings would be somewhat less “severe” than the anti-cookie tracking moves made by Safari and Firefox, which adopted default tracking protection.

Chrome has a 63% market share globally and a 50% share in the U.S. Depending on what Google announces it could be the nail in the cookie coffin — not unlike how Apple killed Flash. Marketers have been anticipating the end of cookies for some time.

Full article: Reported Google browser change could be final death blow to cookies – Marketing Land

How to slow Google Sensorvault from tracking your location on iOS, Android

Not only is Google Maps tracking you, but a program called Google Sensorvault is potentially turning over your location data to law enforcement.

If you want to fully disable location tracking (which, keep in mind, will limit certain apps’ location-driven capabilities), you need to disable another setting called Web & App Activity.

Full article: How to slow Google Sensorvault from tracking your location on iOS, Android – CNET

Tracking Phones, Google Is a Dragnet for the Police

The tech giant records people’s locations worldwide. Now, investigators are using it to find suspects and witnesses near crimes, running the risk of snaring the innocent.

The warrants, which draw on an enormous Google database employees call Sensorvault, turn the business of tracking cellphone users’ locations into a digital dragnet for law enforcement. In an era of ubiquitous data gathering by tech companies, it is just the latest example of how personal information — where you go, who your friends are, what you read, eat and watch, and when you do it — is being used for purposes many people never expected.

Source: Tracking Phones, Google Is a Dragnet for the Police – The New York Times

EU pushes to link tracking databases

Lawmakers are set to approve plans for an enormous new database that will collect biometric data on almost all non-EU citizens in Europe’s visa-free Schengen area.

The database — merging previously separate systems tracking migration, travel and crime — will grant officials access to a person’s verified identity with a single fingerprint scan.

Source: EU pushes to link tracking databases – POLITICO

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