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Tag Archives for " tracking "

Cathay Pacific reveals its use of onboard cameras

Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific reveals its use of cameras on its aircraft, reopening an uncomfortable debate over surveillance aboard airplanes.

While CCTV surveillance is accepted by many as a reassuring security measure, others feel tracking passengers in the confines of an airplane cabin is a step too far.

Full article: Cathay Pacific reveals its use of onboard cameras | CNN Travel

Pentagon testing mass surveillance balloons across the US

The Pentagon has 25 mass surveillance balloons that can monitor and track individual vehicles as they travel across states.

The point of the balloons is “to provide a persistent surveillance system to locate and deter narcotic trafficking and homeland security threats”. But that also means everyday people will be subjected to sweeping government surveillance — without their knowledge or consent.

Source: Pentagon testing mass surveillance balloons across the US | US news | The Guardian

Publishers v. Privacy: Registration Is Coming

The introduction of ad blocking, browser-level advertising and browser-blocking of tracking and cookies should have heralded the beginning of more anonymous browsing.

Instead, these innovations may lead to more user registration and tracking, albeit in a potentially more consent-based manner. Publishers will soon be waging a greater battle with privacy to build a sustainable ad-supported business, writes, Ka Mo Lau, COO of Thunder Experience Cloud.

Full article: Publishers v. Privacy – Registration Is Coming | MarTech Advisor

Appeal against government mass surveillance loses in High Court

The human rights group Liberty has failed in its legal bid to put an end to the Investigatory Powers Act.

The law permits mass monitoring of connected devices to enable intelligence agencies to extend surveillance and government knowledge. But the legislation, branded the “Snoopers’ Charter” by its detractors has come under heavy criticism.

Source: Appeal against government mass surveillance loses in High Court

Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away

Fujifilm is getting into surveillance cameras with the SX800, a long-range surveillance camera with a 40x optical zoom that’s designed to offer security at international borders and large commercial facilities.

Fujifilm says the SX800 will have a total equivalent focal length of 1000mm, which is enough to focus on a car’s license plate from 1km or roughly 0.6 miles away.

For everyone it’s a good reminder that just because you can’t see a security camera, that doesn’t mean one can’t see you, even if it’s multiple kilometers away.

Source: Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away – The Verge

Soon, satellites will be able to watch you everywhere all the time

Every year, commercially available satellite images are becoming sharper and taken more frequently.

Privacy advocates warn that innovation in satellite imagery is outpacing the US government’s (to say nothing of the rest of the world’s) ability to regulate the technology. Unless we impose stricter limits now, they say, one day everyone from ad companies to suspicious spouses to terrorist organizations will have access to tools previously reserved for government spy agencies. Which would mean that at any given moment, anyone could be watching anyone else.

Full article: Soon, satellites will be able to watch you everywhere all the time – MIT Technology Review

Cookies and other tracking devices: the CNIL publishes new guidelines

Without waiting for the future ePrivacy regulation, which is currently under discussion at the European level and which is not likely to come into force in the short term, the CNIL has decided to update its reference framework. In particular, it was necessary to repeal the 2013 recommendation, which was not compatible with the new provisions of the GDPR.

Full article: Cookies and other tracking devices: the CNIL publishes new guidelines

The Washington Post is preparing for post-cookie ad targeting

The Washington Post has internally developed a first-party data ad targeting tool called Zeus Insights, which offers contextual targeting capabilities.

The Zeus platform monitors contextual data such as what article a person is reading or watching, what position they have scrolled to on a page, what URL they have used to arrive there and what they’re clicking on. The publisher will then match that data to its existing audience data pools, which it has accumulated over the last four years, to create assumptions on what that news user’s consumption intent will be. The technology uses machine learning to decipher the patterns.

Full article: The Washington Post is preparing for post-cookie ad targeting – Digiday

This jewelry is a shield against face recognition

For now, it’s an art project, not a product—but it’s a powerful and stylish one.

Nowak’s design must be molded to the wearer’s face to be effective, so she currently has no plans to mass-produce what she considers to be a conceptual work of art rather than a product.

Full article: This jewelry is a shield against face recognition

Google Chrome’s Incognito Mode is way less private than you think

Google Chrome 76 is limiting how you can be tracked in its Incognito Mode. But that doesn’t mean you’re not being tracked at all.

Despite the long-known fact that Incognito isn’t truly anonymous, new research has re-emphasised that Google and other web browsers are still tracking you in privacy mode, even on the most sensitive of sites.

Full article: Google Chrome’s Incognito Mode is way less private than you think | WIRED UK

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