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Tag Archives for " US "

Facebook is ordered to hand over data about thousands of apps that may have violated user privacy

A Massachusetts judge rejected the tech giant’s earlier attempt to withhold the evidence from state officials investigating its privacy practices.

Massachusetts revealed it was probing Facebook over its data-collection practices in September, an investigation that stemmed from the company’s entanglement with Cambridge Analytica.

Source: Massachusetts court orders Facebook to hand over data on apps that may have violated users’ privacy – The Washington Post

US Government-funded Android phones come preinstalled with unremovable malware

An Android phone subsidized by the US government for low-income users comes preinstalled with malware that can’t be removed without making the device cease to work, researchers reported on Thursday.

The first is heavily obfuscated malware that can install adware and other unwanted apps without the knowledge or permission of the user. The second unpleasant surprise is something called Wireless Update. While it provides a mechanism for downloading and installing phone updates, it also loads a barrage of unwanted apps without permission.

Source: US Government-funded Android phones come preinstalled with unremovable malware | Ars Technica

What we’ve learned from California’s Consumer Privacy Act so far

Though CCPA went into force Jan.1, some of the law’s implications are already becoming clear.

First, privacy is not cheap. CCPA delegates rule-making authority (as well as enforcement) to the California Department of Justice.

The second lesson is that privacy laws are prolix. CCPA runs about 10,000 words. That virtually demands that businesses retain dedicated CCPA specialists to advise them — their own readings and the advice of non-specialist lawyers won’t cut it.

Finally, state heterogeneity in privacy law is now inevitable. Some states introduced their own clone-and-revise versions of CCPA in 2019, but none passed. A number of state legislatures will likely restart the CCPA clone-and-revise process in 2020.

Full article: What we’ve learned from California’s Consumer Privacy Act so far | TheHill

Lawmakers push bipartisan update to children’s online privacy law

House lawmakers are introducing a bipartisan bill Thursday to update a long-standing children’s online privacy law so that parents could force companies to delete personal information collected about their kids.

The changes include allowing parents to delete personal information collected online about their kids. The legislation would also require parental consent before companies can collect personal data like names, addresses and selfies from children under 16 years old.

Source: Reps. Walberg and Rush push bipartisan update to children’s online privacy law – Axios

State Legislatures Are Off to the Privacy Races

New Hampshire legislators introduced new data privacy legislation, New Hampshire House Bill 1680.

The legislation is similar to the California Consumer Privacy Act (which we’ve written extensively about before, including here and here ). It grants consumers access, portability, transparency, non-discrimination, deletion, and opt-out-of-sale rights (or opt-into-sale rights for minor consumers) with respect to their personal information.

New Hampshire’s is the first data privacy bill we have seen this season, but it’s worth noting that Virginia and Illinois have introduced their own bills. Additionally, several states, including Washington and New York, had proposed privacy bills in the 2019 legislative session.

Source: State Legislatures Are Off to the Privacy Races, With New Hampshire in the Lead

EU Parliament debates if California could be considered ‘adequate’

Members of the Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs discussed in depth the European Commission’s report, issued Oct. 21, with representatives of the European Commission and European Data Protection Board.

Referring to the California Consumer Privacy Act, which took effect Jan. 1, Bruno Gencarelli, the commission’s head of International Data Flows and Protection Unit, said many of those who worked on the EU General Data Protection Regulation and Law Enforcement Directive “would not even have imagined a few years ago that there would be serious discussion in Congress about a federal privacy legislation or that California would have strong privacy rules that have just entered into application.”

Source: EU Parliament debates: Could California be considered ‘adequate’ on its own?

Ten Questions—And Answers—About the California Consumer Privacy Act

You may have heard from a lot of businesses telling you that they’ve updated their privacy policies because of a new law called the California Consumer Privacy Act. But what’s actually changed for you?

EFF has spent the past year defending this law in the California legislature, but we realize that not everyone has been following it as closely as we have.

Read full article: Ten Questions—And Answers—About the California Consumer Privacy Act

Google To Settle Lawsuit Over Google+ Data Breaches for $7.5 million

Google has agreed to pay $7.5 million to resolve a class-action lawsuit over data breaches that exposed private information of former Google+ users to outside developers.

The proposed settlement allows users of the defunct Google+ who were affected by data breaches to receive between $5 and $12.

Source: Google Agrees To Settle Lawsuit Over Google+ Data Breaches 01/08/2020

Avoid heavy AI regulation, White House tells EU

The US administration has urged European lawmakers to avoid heavy regulation frameworks in the future rollout of Artificial Intelligence technologies on the continent.

The call comes ahead of the European Commission’s planned presentation of its AI strategy, set to be announced early this year.

Source: Avoid heavy AI regulation, White House tells EU – EURACTIV.com

Why a Steak in California Comes With a Privacy Notice

Under California’s new privacy law, even brick and mortar companies have to make it clear you can opt out of having your personal data sold.

That applies not just to giants like Facebook, but to real world establishments lik efast food restaurants.

Full article: Why a Steak in California Comes With a Privacy Notice – VICE

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