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Tag Archives for " US "

U.S. Using Trade Deals to Shield Tech Giants From Foreign Regulators

The Trump administration has begun inserting legal protections into recent trade agreements that shield online platforms like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube from lawsuits, a move that could help lock in America’s tech-friendly regulations around the world even as they are being newly questioned at home.

The administration’s push is the latest salvo in a global fight over who sets the rules for the internet. While the rules for trading goods have largely been written — often by the United States — the world has far fewer standards for digital products. Countries are rushing into this vacuum, and in most cases writing regulations that are far more restrictive than the tech industry would prefer.

Source: U.S. Using Trade Deals to Shield Tech Giants From Foreign Regulators – The New York Times

Centrist Democratic Lawmakers Back Pro-Business Privacy Law

A group of more than 100 centrist Democratic House lawmakers is throwing its weight behind a privacy bill that has been praised by alliances of software and internet giants.

The bill would allow consumers to opt out of the collection, storage and sharing of their data. It would require companies to get consumers to approve any use of sensitive data such as financial or health information and oblige companies to furnish “plain language” privacy policies.

Source: Centrist Democratic Lawmakers Back Pro-Business Privacy Law – Bloomberg

One in three councils using algorithms to make welfare decisions

One in three councils are using computer algorithms to help make decisions about benefit claims and other welfare issues, despite evidence emerging that some of the systems are unreliable.

Companies including the US credit-rating businesses Experian and TransUnion, as well as the outsourcing specialist Capita and Palantir, a data-mining firm co-founded by the Trump-supporting billionaire Peter Thiel, are selling machine-learning packages to local authorities that are under pressure to save money.

Source: One in three councils using algorithms to make welfare decisions | Society | The Guardian

Amazon Calls for Government Regulation of Facial Recognition Tech

Amazon said it believes that governments should act to regulate the use of facial recognition technology to ensure it is used appropriately.

The company said it will back US federal privacy legislation “that requires transparency, access to personal information, ability to delete personal information, and that prohibits the sale of personal data without consent.”

Source: Amazon Calls for Government Regulation of Facial Recognition Tech | SecurityWeek.Com

How Photos of Your Kids Are Powering Surveillance Technology

One day in 2005, a mother in Evanston, Ill., joined Flickr. She uploaded some pictures of her children. Years later, their faces are in a database that’s used to test and train some of the most sophisticated artificial intelligence systems in the world called MegaFace.

By law, most Americans in the database don’t need to be asked for their permission. However, residents of Illinois are protected by one of the strictest state privacy laws on the books: the Biometric Information Privacy Act, a 2008 measure that imposes financial penalties for using an Illinoisan’s fingerprints or face scans without consent.

Full article: How Photos of Your Kids Are Powering Surveillance Technology – The New York Times

Debt Collection Agency to Pay $267 Million in Robocall Lawsuit

On September 10, 2019, California federal judge entered a $267 million judgment against a debt collection agency, Rash Curtis & Associates.

Rash Curtis & Associates contacted consumers via robocall without their prior express consent, a violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). The jury found that the debt collection company made more than 534,000 such unsolicited robocalls.

Source: Verdict: Debt Collection Agency to Pay $267 Million in Robocall Lawsuit | Top Class Actions

EU and US work on electronic evidence agreement

European Commission and U.S. Department of Justice officials met on September 25 to begin formal negotiations on an EU-U.S. agreement to facilitate access to electronic evidence in criminal investigations.

There was agreement to regular negotiating rounds with the view to concluding an agreement as quickly as possible. Progress will be reviewed at the next EU-U.S. Justice and Home Affairs Ministerial in December.

Source: European Commission – PRESS RELEASES – Press release – Criminal justice: Joint statement on the launch of EU-U.S. negotiations to facilitate access to electronic evidence

Amazon is writing facial recognition law

Amazon’s Chief Executive Jeff Bezos said the company’s public policy team is working on proposed regulations around facial recognition, a fledgling technology that has drawn criticism of the technology giant’s cloud computing unit.

Critics have pointed to technology from Amazon and others that struggled to identify the gender of individuals with darker skin in recent studies. That has prompted fears of unjust arrests if the technology is used by more law enforcement agencies to identify suspects.

Source: Amazon CEO says company working on facial recognition regulations – Reuters

New US ransomware bill passed

The US Senate has passed a bill that is aimed to protect public institutions like schools and law enforcement, from ransomware.

The DHS Cyber Hunt and Incident Response Teams Act would authorise the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to create teams to help both private and public entities defend against attacks.

Additionally the cyber hunt and incident response teams, will provide support and technical advice, as well as provide incident response assistance.

Source: #Privacy: New US ransomware bill passed

How to manage, monitor and validate third-party data sharing

When companies manage how personal data is shared and transferred to third parties, much of the effort lately has been focused on bringing legal contracts in line with requirements under the EU General Data Protection Regulation and now, increasingly, the California Consumer Privacy Act.

How can organizations effectively ensure they have the requisite data knowledge to validate data flows and the purpose of processing, as well as monitor data transfers to flag when personal data is going where it shouldn’t?

Read full article: How to manage, monitor and validate third-party data sharing

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