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Tag Archives for " US "

TikTok to Pay $1.1 Million to Settle Kids’ Data Collection Suit

TikTok and its parent company ByteDance have agreed to pay $1.1 million to settle a proposed class action alleging that the app Musical.ly violated children’s privacy laws by collecting their data and operating the app “in a reckless and unlawful manner for commercial gain.”

Complaint against TikTok alleged that Musical.ly—which was acquired by ByteDance 2017 and later rebranded as TikTok— “surreptitiously tracked, collected, and disclosed the personally identifiable information and/or viewing data … of minor children, and then sold that data to third-party advertisers so they could, in turn, market their products and services” on the app.

Source: TikTok to Pay $1.1 Million to Settle Kids’ Data Collection Suit

At Senate, consensus on federal law until you get to ‘private right of action’

There has been no shortage of hearings on privacy this year as U.S. Congress tries to figure out its approach to protecting consumers in the digital age.

But with recent bills released by both Sens. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and Roger Wicker, R-Miss., bills that seemingly have more in common than not, there’s a sense within Senate hallways that perhaps congressional consensus on what federal legislation might contain — and what it won’t — is closer than some predicted.

Full article: At Senate, consensus on federal law until you get to ‘private right of action’

Lawsuit challenges Trump administration’s policy on collecting foreigners’ social media accounts

Free-speech advocates say in a lawsuit filed Thursday that the policy violates federal law and runs afoul of the Constitution.

The requirement — implemented as part of the president’s controversial crackdown on immigration — amounts to an illegal surveillance dragnet that threatens to chill political expression online, according to a group of documentary filmmakers, who filed their case with the backing of two advocacy groups, the Brennan Center for Justice and the Knight First Amendment Institute.

Source: Lawsuit challenges Trump administration’s policy on collecting foreigners’ social media accounts – The Washington Post

FISA reauthorization: What will Europe think?

US Congress is considering permanently reauthorizing four provisions, two of which are unused, of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that are set to expire Dec. 15.

Considering the ongoing scrutiny of U.S. government surveillance practices, lawmakers should carefully consider the permanent reauthorization of the unused provisions.

Full article: FISA reauthorization: What will Europe think?

DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports

Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers — including American citizens — be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology.

The Department of Homeland Security says it expects to publish a proposed rule next July. Facial recognition is already being tested by several airlines at a number of U.S. airports.

Source: DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports | Time

AG Opinion in Schrems II Delayed

The Advocate General’s (AG) Opinion in Case C-311/18, Data Protection Commissioner v Facebook Ireland and Maximillian Schrems (so called “Schrems II”), has been delayed until the 19 th December 2019.

The primary question before the European Court of Justice, and the AG, in Schrems II is whether the European Commission’s standard contractual clauses are valid for transfers of personal data to the United States.

Source: UPDATE: AG Opinion in Schrems II Delayed

Top Senate Democrats unveil new online privacy bill, promising tough penalties for data abuse

Senate Democrats on Tuesday proposed tough, new punishments for Facebook, Google and other Silicon Valley tech giants that mishandle their users’ personal data, unveiling a sweeping new online privacy bill that aims to provide people their “Miranda rights” for the digital age.

To enforce the rules, Senate Democrats have proposed granting new powers to the FTC to police against a wide array of practices that could cause consumers harm.

The proposal would open the door for state attorneys general to bring cases under federal law as well, and would permit people to sue tech companies if their privacy has been violated.

Source: Top Senate Democrats unveil new online privacy bill, promising tough penalties for data abuse – The Washington Post

Lawmakers introduce bill to help police access digital evidence during investigations 

Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.) on Friday introduced bipartisan legislation to help police officers learn how to access digital evidence, including data and online messages, during investigations.

The Technology in Criminal Justice Act would create a new office at the Department of Justice to educate state and local law enforcement agencies about how to sift through digital evidence — on phones and computers — in a way that does not flout the law. The legislation would also create a federal center to serve as a central clearinghouse providing training, tech expertise and legal assistance on gathering digital evidence.

Source: Lawmakers introduce bill to help police access digital evidence during investigations | TheHill

Less than half of US businesses are ready for CCPA compliance

The survey, conducted by Osterman Research, Inc., revealed the current state of security team preparedness and critical gaps in compliance with the California Consumer Protection Act (CCPA) before it comes into effect on 1st January 2020.

Key findings include only 15% of organisations report having a mature approach to data privacy, more than half (59%) have yet to allocate budget to CCPA compliance, and 58% are currently using or will look to implement machine learning-driven systems to improve manual processes for data security.

Source: #Privacy: Less than half of US businesses are ready for CCPA compliance

How Washington state lawmakers plan to regulate data privacy and facial recognition

Washington state legislators will push for new regulations governing data privacy and facial recognition next year.

The new legislation builds on a bill that passed the Senate before dying in the House last session. The bill’s sponsors say they are taking lessons from that experience, though several of the sticking points that contributed to the last bill’s demise remain.

Source: Sneak peek: How Washington state lawmakers plan to regulate data privacy and facial recognition – GeekWire

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