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Tag Archives for " US "

Facebook’s FTC fine will be $5 billion—or one month’s worth of revenue

The Federal Trade Commission and Facebook have reportedly agreed on a $5 billion fine that would settle the FTC’s privacy investigation into the social network.

Fine will settle privacy investigation triggered by Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Source: Facebook’s FTC fine will be $5 billion—or one month’s worth of revenue | Ars Technica

Palantir Manual Shows How Law Enforcement Tracks Families

Palantir’s surveillance software has become a backbone of US law enforcement, particularly Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Palantir’s secret user manuals for law enforcement shows that with just the name of a person, law enforcement can use Palantir’s software to map that target’s family relationships, get their Social Security number, address, phone number, height, weight, and eye color. Add a license plate number, and Palantir’s system can often allow law enforcement to track where people have been during any period of time.

Source: Palantir Manual Shows How Law Enforcement Tracks Families | WIRED

House Lawmakers Target Autumn for Data Privacy Bill

As talks on a data privacy bill reportedly lose steam in the Senate, two Democratic House aides familiar with ongoing discussions said the House Energy and Commerce Committee is targeting the end of September or early October to introduce its own version of privacy legislation.

Both aides said discussions have started about what a bill could look like, with plans for the consumer protection subcommittee chaired by Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.) to head up the effort. The sources said their offices have yet to see a draft of the bill language.

Full article: House Lawmakers Target September, October for Data Privacy Bill, Aides Say

California Considers Amending New Privacy Law

The California senate judiciary committee is expected to consider amendments that could significantly water down the state’s landmark privacy law.

One of the amendments would revise the definition of “de-identified” data to include material that is not “reasonably linkable” to a particular consumer. That would make the law more friendly to online marketers by exempting IP addresses, device identifiers and other pseudonymous identifiers from the material covered by the measure.

Another proposed amendment would weaken a provision that prohibits companies from charging higher prices to consumers who opt out of data collection and selling.

Source: California Considers Amending New Privacy Law 07/09/2019

Why Is America So Far Behind Europe on Digital Privacy?

Americans have been far too vulnerable for far too long when they venture online.

It’s taken more than a decade of shocking revelations — of data breaches
and other privacy abuses — to get to this moment, when there finally seems to be enough momentum to pass a federal law.

Full article: Opinion | Why Is America So Far Behind Europe on Digital Privacy? – The New York Times

Government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs

A government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs — including from driver’s licenses, passports and mug shots — that can be searched using facial recognition technology.

The fact was reported by the Government Accountability Office at a congressional hearing in which both Democrats and Republicans raised questions about the use of the technology.

The figure reflects how the technology is becoming an increasingly powerful law enforcement tool, but is also stirring fears about the potential for authorities to intrude on the lives of Americans.

Source: Government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs [Video]

Pressure mounts on patchwork data privacy laws across US states

Enterprise resistance to tightening data privacy standards is increasing in the US, as states develop their own online data protection laws.

Among the nation’s most stringent restrictions upon ISPs (internet service providers), a law put in place in Maine last month prevents companies from using, selling or sharing consumer data without the data owner’s consent.

Source: Pressure mounts on patchwork data privacy laws across US states

SCHREMS 2.0 – the demise of Standard Contractual Clauses and Privacy Shield?

On July 9th, Europe’s highest court – the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) – is set to hear a case concerning the validity of two key data transfer mechanisms: Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) and Privacy Shield – mechanisms widely used by businesses within the European Economic Area (EEA) to legitimise the transfer of personal data to countries outside the EEA.

There is a significant risk the CJEU will declare these transfer mechanisms as invalid. If this happens, many organisations will be left without any practical solution to legitimise the international transfer of personal data outside the EEA and exposure to the threat of GDPR revenue based fines, regulatory sanctions including injunctions and third party claims for compensation.

Read full article: SCHREMS 2.0 – the demise of Standard Contractual Clauses and Privacy Shield?

Facebook and Google could be forced to tell you how much your data is worth under new US legislation

Tech companies like Facebook and Google could be forced to reveal how much individual users’ data is worth to them under new legislation in the US, according under new legislation in the US.

Putting a dollar figure on how much people’s data is worth is unlikely to be straightforward for the companies involved and the bill could provoke opposition.

Source: Facebook and Google could be forced to tell you how much your data is worth under new US legislation | Business Insider India

Privacy Shield Ombudsperson Confirmed by US Senate

On June 20, 2019, Keith Krach was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become the Trump administration’s first permanent Privacy Shield Ombudsperson at the State Department.

The role of the Privacy Shield Ombudsperson is to act as an additional redress avenue for all EU data subjects whose data is transferred from the EU or Switzerland to the U.S. under the EU-U.S. and the Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework, respectively.

Source: Privacy Shield Ombudsperson Confirmed by the Senate

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