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Americans more concerned about data privacy than healthcare

Americans believe that companies should have a mission that goes beyond the money—one that has a positive impact on world hunger, job creation and education, according to the latest Harris Poll data.  According to 65 percent of survey participants, Data privacy most pressing issue.

Source: Americans more concerned about data privacy than healthcare, study says

Full Congress support for bill on US cyber security

A bipartisan bill to create a new team to pioneer federal government cybersecurity has had unanimous backing in the House of Representatives in the US, the Register reports . Earlier in 2018, the Senate passed the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) Act, though this would revamp the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)’s National Protection and Programs Directorate to enable CISA as an independent agency within the DHS.

Full article: Full Congress support for bill on US cyber security

More than 50 nations, but not U.S., sign onto cybersecurity pact

French President Emmanuel Macron released an international agreement on cybersecurity principles Monday as part of the Paris Peace Forum. The original signatories included more than 50 nations, 130 private sector groups and 90 charitable groups and universities, but not the United States, Russia or China.

The Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace is another step in the disjointed effort to create international norms and laws for cybersecurity and warfare. In most international matters of regulating the internet, there tends to be a wide split between the liberal Western order and authoritarian nations like Russia and China.

Full article: More than 50 nations, but not U.S., sign onto cybersecurity pact – Axios

EU Commission Comments on NTIA’s Approach to Consumer Privacy

On November 9, 2018, the European Commission (“the Commission”) submitted comments to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (“NTIA”) in response to its request for public comments on developing the administration’s approach to consumer privacy.

In its comments, the Commission welcomes and agrees with many of the high-level goals identified by NTIA, including harmonization of the legal landscape, incentivizing privacy research, employing a risk-based approach and creating interoperability at a global level.

Full article: EU Commission Responds to NTIA Request for Comment on Developing the Administration’s Approach to Consumer Privacy

U.S. Court Allows Video Deposition Over EU Deponent’s Privacy Objections

A U.S. court has recently ruled that an EU citizen’s privacy rights and the GDPR do not trump a U.S. litigant’s right to obtain discovery, including video-taped depositions.  A federal magistrate denied an EU citizen’s motion for protective order, holding that the deponent could not rely on EU privacy law to withhold consent to a duly-noted video-recorded deposition scheduled to take place in London.

Full article: U.S. Court Allows Video Deposition Over EU Deponent’s Privacy Objections

Intel launches online portal for consultation on its US federal privacy law

Intel has now become the latest entity to throw its proposal into the ring. The tech company has released a draft bill for a federal law it hopes would regulate consumer privacy without impacting innovation. Intel did not just release a draft bill, however, but also an online portal where, until Nov. 19, privacy professionals and the public can discuss the merits of the proposed rules and where improvements could be made.

Full article: Intel launches online portal for consultation on its US federal privacy law

Microsoft to comply with the data localisation requests from all countries

Microsoft is committed to complying with the law of the land when it comes to data privacy and will honour data localisation requests from all countries, including India.

“We will have to comply with data laws of various countries. That is mandatory for us. We are already fully compliant with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and will do the same with other countries’ data protection laws,” Ann Johnson, Corporate Vice President, Cybersecurity Solutions Group at Microsoft, told IANS.

As the tech companies demand data to flow freely, Johnson said in order to improve current security and intelligent systems against cybercriminals who are well funded, certain sets of data have to move freely among the countries.

Source: Microsoft to comply with the data localisation requests from all countries- Technology News, Firstpost

Sen. Mark Warner on breaking up Facebook and Congress’ plan to regulate tech

For the past two years, Silicon Valley has faced a reckoning in Congress, but there’s been no matching push for regulation. While Mark Zuckerberg has been called before Congress and the inner workings of the tech industry have been put under a microscope, no major federal legislation has been passed, leaving some to wonder whether the US government will step in at all.

Over the summer, Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) put out the most comprehensive plan yet for how Congress might regulate Big Tech: his white paper laid out 20 different suggestions, ranging from labeling bots to implementing broader rules like those in the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). It was the most comprehensive effort by any lawmaker, and with it, Warner positioned himself as a key voice in the debate over regulating the tech industry.

Source: Sen. Mark Warner on breaking up Facebook and Congress’ plan to regulate tech – The Verge

Will Google+ be the final push US Congress needs to pass restrictions on data use?

Congress held a hearing a few weeks ago in response to news that Google kept secret a flaw that exposed almost 500,000 users’private user data on its Google+ platform. Though there is no evidence that data was actually used, and data breach laws as written today do not kick in until there is an actual “breach” involving an unauthorized acquisition of the data.

However, Google deliberately hid the problem from the public in order to avoid the type of bad publicity Facebook was getting from its Cambridge Analytica data breach. U.S. Senators at the hearing appeared to be troubled both by the legal loophole protecting Google from disclosure and with Google’s calculated decision to keep secrets.

Source: Will Google+ be the final push Congress needs to pass restrictions on data use? – MarTech Today

Facebook’s court appeal over data transfer case set for January

Facebook’s unprecedented Supreme Court appeal aimed at halting a referral to the European Court of Justice (CJEU) concerning the validity of EU-US data transfer channels will be heard in January.

The court previously set a provisional hearing date of December 19th but, following a case management hearing on Thursday, has now fixed the case for January 21st.

Source: Facebook’s court appeal over data transfer case set for January

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