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Tag Archives for " US "

FTC Hits TikTok With Record $5.7 Million Fine Over Children’s Privacy

The company will pay $5.7 million to settle allegations that the social media app formerly known as Musical.ly illegally collected information from children under 13.

TikTok must also comply with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, going forward and take down any videos uploaded by users under 13.

The FTC’s complaint alleges that Musical.ly violated COPPA by failing to require parental consent for users under 13, neglecting to notify parents about how the app collected personal information on underage users, and not permitting parents to request to have their children’s data deleted.

Source: FTC Hits TikTok With Record $5.7 Million Fine Over Children’s Privacy | WIRED

Ad world flocks to Congress urging federal data privacy legislation

Leaders in advertising and consumer privacy have descended upon Washington, DC to push Congress to pass federal legislation on data protection that dodges the pitfalls of GDPR and avoids a patchwork of state-by-state laws.

Without federal legislation, the fear is an amalgamation of state laws that present confusion and challenges for consumers and advertisers.

Source: Ad world flocks to Congress urging federal data privacy legislation | The Drum

Calls for Federal US Privacy Law

This month, the Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) released a report recommending that Congress consider enacting a federal internet privacy law in the United States.

The 56-page independent report was requested by the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has scheduled a hearing on data privacy on February 26, during which it plans to discuss the GAO’s findings.

Source: GAO Report Calls for Federal Privacy Law

Police departments force Google to hand over data on anyone near a crime scene.

Police departments are using “reverse location search warrants” to force Google to hand over data on anyone near a crime scene. These legal mandates allow law enforcement to sweep up the coordinates and movements of every cellphone in a broad area.

Many privacy advocates argue that these sort of indiscriminate data sweeps are prohibited under the Fourth Amendment, which generally dictates that searches by law enforcement need to be specific and limited only to what’s necessary. One of the main concerns with these generalized searches is that the data of unsuspecting innocent people inevitably falls into the hands of police. Even though these people might not be breaking any laws, the information that such methods dredge up could still be revealing and sensitive.

Source: Reverse location search warrants: How police departments force Google to hand over data on anyone near a crime scene.

Creating meaningful data protection out of US privacy proposals

The IAPP recently reviewed a set of proposals from U.S. lawmakers for a new piece of federal privacy legislation, as well as comments submitted to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration in response to their proposed framework to protect data privacy.

Full article: Creating meaningful data protection out of US privacy proposals

Facebook Is about to Get a Massive Fine. It Probably Won’t Change Anything

The U.S. government will hit Facebook with a record-breaking multibillion-dollar fine over privacy violations.

Yet experts warn that despite the reported size of the penalty levied by the Federal Trade Commission, without legal restrictions on how Facebook collects and processes data the impact will be limited.

Full article: Facebook Is about to Be Hit with a Massive Fine. It Probably Won’t Change Anything. – VICE

California governor wants users to profit from online data

California Gov. Gavin Newsom says the state’s consumers should get a piece of the billions of dollars that technology companies make off the personal data they collect.

The new governor has asked aides to develop a proposal for a “data dividend” for California residents but provided no hints about whether he might be suggesting a tax on tech companies, an individual refund to their customers or something else.

Source: California governor wants users to profit from online data | The Sacramento Bee

FTC Decides Not to Modify CAN-SPAM Rule

On February 12, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced that, after a review of the Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act (“CAN-SPAM”) Rule as part of its periodic review of its regulations, it has determined that the Rule does not need to be modified at this time.

Source: FTC Decides Not to Modify CAN-SPAM Rule

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