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Tag Archives for " WhatsApp "

Why consumer messaging apps raise business data security fears?

Consumer apps such as WhatsApp are widely used by businesses as a free and easy method of mobile communication, but they have a downside – they aren’t fully secure and they aren’t GDPR compliant when used in the work place. In July 2018 WhatsApp was named by mobile device security company, Appthority , as one of the apps most often blacklisted by businesses.

Read article: The app trap: Why consumer messaging apps raise business data security fears

Cybersecurity Firm Finds Way to Alter WhatsApp Messages

A cybersecurity company said it had discovered a flaw in WhatsApp, the Facebook-owned messaging service with 1.5 billion users, that allows scammers to alter the content or change the identity of the sender of a previously delivered message. WhatsApp, however, says it is still safe, and what Check Point Software discovered was a system operating as it was intended.

Source: Cybersecurity Firm Finds Way to Alter WhatsApp Messages – The New York Times

noyb.eu filed complaints against Google, Instagram, WhatsApp and Facebook

One the first day of GDPR noyb.eu has filed four complaints against Google (Android), Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram over “forced consent”.

Very similar complaints were field with four authorities, to enable European coordination. In addition to the four authorities at the residence of the users, the Irish Data Protection Commissioner will probably get involved in the cases too, as the headquarter of the relevant companies is in Ireland in three cases.

Source: noyb.eu – My Privacy is none of your Business

WhatsApp raises minimum age to 16 for Europeans ahead of GDPR

Facebook-owned messaging service will demand users confirm they are old enough to use app after raising age limit from 13.

WhatsApp is raising the minimum user age from 13 to 16, potentially locking out large numbers of teenagers as the messaging app looks to comply with the EU’s new data protection rules.

Source: WhatsApp raises minimum age to 16 for Europeans ahead of GDPR

WhatsApp will not share user data with Facebook until it complies with GDPR

Facebook, its popular messaging app WhatsApp, and the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) have reached a truce in their long-running investigation over how Facebook and WhatsApp share user data.

The ICO today announced that it has closed its investigation and concluded that WhatsApp and Facebook, in fact, cannot and do not share user data for anything other than basic data processing.

The two most significant upshots of this: WhatsApp (and Facebook) will not be fined; and the ICO has gotten WhatsApp to sign an undertaking in which it has committed publicly not to share personal data with Facebook in the future until the two services can do it in a way that is compliant with General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Source: WhatsApp will not share user data with Facebook until it complies with GDPR, ICO closes investigation | TechCrunch

WhatsApp sharing user data with Facebook would be illegal, rules ICO

The UK’s data protection watchdog has concluded that WhatsApp’s sharing of user data with its parent company Facebook would have been illegal.

The messaging app was forced to pause sharing of personal data with Facebook in November 2016, after the Information Commissioner’s Office said it had cause for concern. The ICO opened a full investigation into the matter in August that year.

Source: WhatsApp sharing user data with Facebook would be illegal, rules ICO | Technology | The Guardian

Dark Caracal: Good News and Bad News

Few days ago EFF and Lookout announced a new report, Dark Caracal, that uncovers a new, global malware espionage campaign. One aspect of that campaign was the use of malicious, fake apps to impersonate legitimate popular apps like Signal and WhatsApp. Some readers had questions about what this means for them. This blog post is here to answer those questions and dive further into the Dark Caracal report.

Source: Dark Caracal: Good News and Bad News | Electronic Frontier Foundation

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