Category Archives for "Court cases"

French man who kept porn on work computer loses privacy appeal

A man who kept a stash of pornography on his work computer has failed to convince judges his right to a private life was infringed when his employer opened the personal files containing the material without his knowledge.

Eric Libert was fired by the French national rail operator SNCF in 2008 after his boss discovered the pornographic files and a series of forged certificates. He asked the European court of human rights to rule on his case after he was unsuccessful in the French courts.

Source: French man who kept porn on work computer loses privacy appeal | World news | The Guardian

German court says Facebook’s real name policy is illegal

A German court ruled that Facebook’s real name policy is illegal and that users must be allowed to sign up for the service under pseudonyms to comply with a decade-old privacy law. The ruling, made last month but only now being announced, comes from the Berlin Regional Court and was detailed today by the Federation of German Consumer Organizations (abbreviated from German as VZBV), which filed the lawsuit against Facebook.

Facebook says it will appeal the ruling, but also that it will make changes to comply with European Union privacy laws coming into effect in June, according to Reuters. “We are working hard to ensure that our guidelines are clear and easy to understand, and that the services offered by Facebook are in full accordance with the law,” a Facebook spokesperson said.

Source: German court says Facebook’s real name policy is illegal – The Verge

Lawsuits threaten infosec research — just when we need it most

Security researchers and reporters have something in common: both hold the powerful accountable. But doing so has painted a target on their backs — and looming threats of legal action and lawsuits have many concerned.

Source: Lawsuits threaten infosec research — just when we need it most | ZDNet

Facebook loses Belgian privacy case, faces fine of up to €100 million

A Belgian court threatened Facebook on Friday with a fine of up to 100 million euros ($125 million) if it continued to break privacy laws by tracking people on third-party websites.

In a case brought by Belgium’s privacy watchdog, the court also ruled that Facebook had to delete all data it had gathered illegally on Belgian citizens, including people who were not Facebook users themselves.

Source: Facebook loses Belgian privacy case, faces fine of up to $125 million

Facebook ordered to stop collecting user data by Belgian court

Facebook has been ordered by a Belgian court to stop collecting data on users or face daily fines of €250,000 a day, or up to €100m. The court ruled on Friday that Facebook had broken privacy laws by tracking people on third-party sites in the latest salvo in a long-running battle between the Belgian commission for the protection of privacy (CPP) and the social network.

Source: Facebook ordered to stop collecting user data by Belgian court | Technology | The Guardian

EU Law Analysis: Data Retention is still here to stay, for now…

This post critically analyses the Court of Appeal’s judgment in Tom Watson and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department with regards to general data retention, access to communications data on the basis of prior review by a court or an independent administrative body and notifications.

Source: EU Law Analysis: Data Retention is still here to stay, for now…

PNR Agreements between Fundamental Rights and National Security

On July 26, 2017, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) issued Opinion 1/15 (the Opinion of the Advocate General on this case had been discussed previously in this blog, part I and part II) pursuant to Article 218(11) TFEU on the draft agreement between Canada and the European Union (EU) dealing with the Transfer of Passenger Name Record (PNR) data from the EU to Canada.

Source: PNR Agreements between Fundamental Rights and National Security: Opinion 1/15 | European Law Blog

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