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Category Archives for "Court cases"

German top court strikes down plank of anti-terror law

Germany’s top court said on Friday it had struck down a key passage of an anti-terror law on data protection grounds, raising the bar for security services to swap information.

The Federal Constitutional Court said the passage of the measure in question was too vague in granting permission for intelligence on terror suspects to be shared from a central security database.

Source: German top court strikes down plank of anti-terror law

Court: Muslim Men Can Sue FBI Agents Over No-Fly List

A unanimous Supreme Court ruled that Muslim men who were placed on the government’s no-fly list because they refused to serve as FBI informants can seek to hold federal agents financially liable.

The justices continued a string of decisions friendly to religious interests in holding that the men could sue the agents under the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act for what it calls “appropriate relief.”

Source: Muslim Men Can Sue FBI Agents Over No-Fly List: SCOTUS | HuffPost

Amazon Sued For Wiretapping Drivers’ Closed Facebook Groups

Amazon Flex Driver Drickey Jackson alleged that Amazon “wiretapp(ed) the electronic communications of Amazon Flex Drivers’ closed Facebook groups,” according to a class action complaint filed in the Souther District of California.

According to the complaint, Amazon sought to “secretly observe and monitor Flex Drivers’ electronic communications and confidential postings in their closed Facebook groups, through the use of monitoring tools, automated software, and dedicated employees with backgrounds in signals intelligence and communications intelligence,” who purportedly deployed said tools “as part of their … duties on behalf of Amazon.” In particular, the plaintiff cited the existence of a document listing 43 closed Flex Driver Facebook groups that Amazon purportedly monitors.

Source: Amazon Sued For Wiretapping Drivers’ Closed Facebook Groups – Tech

Court orders encrypted email biz Tutanota to build a backdoor in user’s mailbox

Tutanota has been served with a court order to backdoor its encrypted email service – a situation founder Matthias Pfau described to The Register as “absurd.”

Court in Germany last month ordered Tutanota to help investigators monitor the contents of a user’s encrypted mailbox. The site has until the end of the year to add functionality to perform this surveillance.

Source: Court orders encrypted email biz Tutanota to build a backdoor in user’s mailbox, founder says ‘this is absurd’ • The Register

Facebook lawsuits: the biggest tech battle yet, and one that is long overdue

Facebook is facing perhaps its greatest existential threat yet as the company prepares to battle two antitrust lawsuits brought by the US government and more than 40 states. But while analysts are calling the crackdown an important step, whether the social media giant can be reined in remains to be seen.

The lawsuits brought against Facebook on Wednesday accuse the company of wielding its “monopoly power” to crush and overwhelm its rivals. The cases tackle Facebook’s acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp in particular, deals which federal regulators now say should be unwound.

Source: Facebook lawsuits: the biggest tech battle yet, and one that is long overdue

Class action suit launched against Dell after data breach led to years of scam calls

A proposed class action suit has been launched against Dell Technologies on behalf of thousands of Canadians whose personal information was compromised in a data breach.

According to a claim filed in a Nova Scotia court, the suit’s proposed representative plaintiff is seeking compensation for two years of scam calls and emails he received after a 2017 data breach exposed information about him and more than 7,000 other Dell customers.

Source: Class action suit launched against Dell after data breach led to years of scam calls – National | Globalnews.ca

Swedish court rejects Google’s appeal in RTBF case

The Swedish Administrative Court of Stockholm confirmed Google violated the EU General Data Protection Regulation in several instances and rejected Google’s motion that Sweden’s data protection authority’s, Datainspektionen, decisions repealed due to formal deficiencies.

The court upheld the fine of SEK 50 million, while the court lowered the fine for one violation from SEK 25 million to 2 million. The fine was lowered because one complaint was partly dismissed and one instance was not considered a violation (since Google adhered to the injunction without undue delay).

Source: Swedish court rejects Google’s appeal in RTBF case

Facebook Asks Supreme Court To Decide Whether Tracking Violates Wiretap Law

Facebook is urging the Supreme Court to take up a long-running dispute about whether tracking logged-out users via the “Like” button violates a law restricting the interception of online communications.

In a petition filed quietly last week, the social networking service argues that the battle over tracking “presents a question of critical importance” — namely, whether “certain ubiquitous practices in the technology industry involving computer-to-computer communications violate the federal Wiretap Act.”

Source: Facebook Asks Supreme Court To Decide Whether Tracking Violates Wiretap Law 11/30/2020

Facebook Pays Russia $50K Fine For Not Localizing User Data

Facebook has paid Russian authorities a 4 million ruble ($53,000) fine over its refusal to comply with controversial data localization laws.

Under laws which came into force in 2016, Russia requires all foreign technology companies to store data related to their Russian customers and users on servers located inside Russia.

Source: Facebook Pays Russia $50K Fine For Not Localizing User Data – The Moscow Times

German Court Slashes a GDPR Privacy Fine by 90%

A German appeals court has slashed by 90% a General Data Protection Regulation fine levied by the nation’s federal privacy watchdog against 1&1 Telecom over call center data protection shortcomings.

In December 2019, Germany’s Federal Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, or BfDI, announced a fine of 9.6 million euros ($11.3 million) – at the time, the second-largest privacy fine ever announced in Germany – against 1&1 Telecom.

Source: German Court Slashes a GDPR Privacy Fine by 90%

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