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Category Archives for "Legislation"

Japan enacts Act on the Protection of Personal Information

On June 5, the law amending the Act on the Protection of Personal Information was enacted.

After the Cabinet order and rules of the Personal Information Protection Commission regarding the amendments are made, the new law is expected to take effect in the first half of 2022 or last quarter of 2021, although it is not clear exactly when.

Source: Japan enacts Act on the Protection of Personal Information

Israel Steps Back From Law Involving Secret Service in COVID-19 Tracing

Following widespread protest by the Israeli privacy community and the population at large, a decision by the Israeli Supreme Court and a statement from the head of the Israeli Secret Service that its involvement is not necessary given the current state of the pandemic—the Israeli cabinet has decided to withdraw a controversial law allowing monitoring of COVID-19 spread through invasive cellphone tracking by the Israeli Secret Service.

Source: Israel Steps Back From Law Involving Secret Service in COVID-19 Tracing

California AG Won’t Delay CCPA Enforcement, but May Exercise Prosecutorial Discretion

California’s Attorney General won’t delay enforcement of key provisions of the California Consumer Privacy Act, but will use prosecutorial discretion in enforcing them, according to its Final Statement of Reasons for the regulations.

When asked to delay enforcement of the regulations, the AG responded that no delay is required because the proposed rules were released on Oct. 11, 2019, Feb. 10 and March 11 and thus businesses have been aware of the obligations imposed.

Source: California AG Won’t Delay CCPA Enforcement, but May Exercise Prosecutorial Discretion

Facial recognition bill falls flat in California legislature

A state Assembly committee stopped a bill allowing companies and government agencies to use the controversial surveillance technology without consent.

The bill received lobbying support from Microsoft, but faced opposition from several civil liberties groups, including the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Facial recognition has already been outlawed by some California cities, including San Francisco and Berkeley, which banned government use of the technologies with measures backed by the ACLU.

Source: Facial recognition bill falls flat in California legislature

Assembly leader says state legislature will repeal police privacy law

For almost half a century, Section 50-A of a New York state law sealed personnel information about police officers, firefighters and corrections officers.

Some of it is truly personal: home address, family information, even data about a police officer who might once have had substance problems. That information may become public Monday, with state legislators and Gov. Andrew Cuomo planning to repeal that legal provision of the Civil Service Law and open up information.

Source: Assembly leader says state legislature will repeal police privacy law today | WBFO

California AG posts final proposed CCPA Regulations

The California Attorney General has posted the final proposed CCPA Regulations, which were submitted to the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL) on June 1, 2020.

The final proposed regulations are virtually unchanged from the prior version, posted on March 11. Along with the final proposed CCPA regulations, the AG also posted its Final Statement of Reasons (FSOR).

Source: US: California AG posts final proposed CCPA Regulations and offers insights ahead of July 1 enforcement deadline

EU Council Presidency Releases Progress Report on Draft ePrivacy Regulation

On June 3, 2020, the Presidency of the Council of the European Union (“the Presidency”) published a progress report on the proposed Regulation concerning the Respect for Private Life and the Protection of Personal Data in Electronic Communications and Repealing Directive 2002/58/EC (Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications), better known as “the Draft ePrivacy Regulation”.

The Progress Report highlights that the most important modification introduced by the Presidency in the latest draft ePrivacy Regulation is the possibility of relying on the “legitimate interest” ground to (1) process electronic communications’ metadata, and (2) place cookies or similar technologies on end-users’ terminals, subject to specific conditions and safeguards.

Source: EU Council Presidency Releases Progress Report on Draft ePrivacy Regulation

EU data protection rules abused to censor media

While the controversial GDPR was intended to offer greater privacy rights, it has also been abused by some authorities to muzzle a free press.

Two years after its launch and the EU’s data protection rules have been used to muzzle journalists in Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia, according to new research.

Full article: EU data protection rules abused to censor media

Thailand postpones Personal Data Protection Act to 2021

The Thailand government has approved a Royal Decree to postpone the enforcement of the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA) to next year. As COVID-19 rages through the country, the Government of Thailand has pushed back the PDPA effective date to May 31, 2021.

Previously scheduled to come into force this year, certain data controllers’ compliance with main provisions concerning personal data protection, has been deferred for another year.

Source: #Privacy: Thailand postpones PDPA to 2021

Lawmakers to unveil bipartisan privacy bill to regulate contact-tracing apps

Senate lawmakers plan to unveil a bipartisan bill on Monday that would regulate contact-tracing and exposure-notification apps, seeking to ensure new digital tools meant to combat the coronavirus don’t come at the expense of users’ privacy.

The proposal, called the “Exposure Notification Privacy Act,” would erect federal guardrails around Silicon Valley’s nascent efforts to track people’s movements and alert them whenever they come in close contact with someone who has tested positive for covid-19. Democrats and Republicans led by Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) say the legislation is necessary to ensure tracking isn’t forced on those who don’t want it — and to ensure any data that’s collected isn’t put to commercial use.

Source: Lawmakers to unveil bipartisan privacy bill to regulate contact-tracing apps – The Washington Post

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