Category Archives for "Other"

Facebook to change terms of service for members outside Europe ahead of GDPR

The company says that despite the timing of the move, all users will have the same data privacy protections.

Facebook will change the way it administers its terms of service (TOS) for 1.5 million users in Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America, the company confirmed today. Though users in those territories previously agreed to TOS dictated by the company’s corporate entity in the EU nation of Ireland, now they must legally agree to be bound by the US-based corporation’s terms.

Source: Facebook to change terms of service for members outside Europe ahead of GDPR – MarTech Today

The Facebook Privacy Setting That Doesn’t Do Anything at All

For years, Facebook has left a privacy setting on its site that addresses a problem that no longer exists.

But the fact that Facebook never bothered to update that critical corner of its privacy settings, years after those changes went into effect, is downright baffling—and speaks to a general a lack of seriousness in the company’s attitude toward data transparency.

Source: The Facebook Privacy Setting That Doesn’t Do Anything at All | WIRED

Facebook starts to roll out GDPR notifications and consent requests

The company may have an uphill battle ahead to get users to share personal data.

Facebook previously announced that it would apply General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) privacy protections and rules globally to all its users. This was a major decision — partly practical, partly principled and partly public relations. Yesterday, the company began to explain how it will start implementation of the new guidelines.

Source: Facebook starts to roll out GDPR notifications and consent requests – MarTech Today

Facebook to start asking permission for facial recognition in GDPR push

Facebook has started to seek explicit consent from users for targeted advertising, storage of sensitive information, and – for the first time in the EU – application of facial recognition technology as the European general data protection regulation (GDPR) is due to come into force in just over a month.

The company is only required to seek the new permissions in the European Union, but it plans to roll them out to all Facebook users, no matter where they live. The move follows Mark Zuckerberg’s stated goal to apply the spirit of GDPR worldwide.

Source: Facebook to start asking permission for facial recognition in GDPR push | Technology | The Guardian

EU privacy watchdogs to look into harvesting of data from social media

European Union privacy watchdogs will look deeper into the harvesting of personal data from social networks for economic or political purposes following the scandal engulfing Facebook Inc. after data from nearly 87 million users was improperly accessed.

“A multi-billion dollar social media platform saying it is sorry simply is not enough,” Andrea Jelinek, chair of the group of EU data protection authorities, said in a statement on Thursday.

Source: EU privacy watchdogs to look into harvesting of data from social media

Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case

A businessman has won his legal action to remove search results about a criminal conviction in a landmark “right to be forgotten” case that could have wide-ranging repercussions.

The ruling was made by Mr Justice Warby in London on Friday. The judge rejected a similar claim brought by a second businessman who was jailed for a more serious offence.

Source: Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case | Technology | The Guardian

What You Don’t Know About How Facebook Uses Your Data

Facebook tracks even nonusers as they surf the web, and House members grilled Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, about the practice during his second day of hearings.

Facebook meticulously scrutinizes the minutiae of its users’ online lives, and its tracking stretches far beyond the company’s well-known targeted advertisements. Details that people often readily volunteer — age, employer, relationship status, likes and location — are just the start.

Source: What You Don’t Know About How Facebook Uses Your Data – The New York Times

User Privacy Isn’t Solely a Facebook Issue

During Congressional hearings about Facebook’s data practices in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica fiasco, Mark Zuckerberg drew an important distinction between what we expect from our Internet service providers (ISPs, such as Comcast or Verizon) as opposed to platforms like Facebook that operate over the Internet.

Put simply, an ISP is a service you pay to access the Internet. Once you get online, you run into a whole series of edge providers. Some, like Netflix, also charge you for access to their services. Others, like Facebook and Google, are platforms that you use without paying, which support themselves using ads. There’s a whole spectrum of services that make up Internet use, but the thing they all have in common is that they are gathering data when you use them. How they use it can differ widely.

Source: User Privacy Isn’t Solely a Facebook Issue | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Consumer groups file FTC complaint against YouTube for collecting kids’ personal data without parental consent

A coalition of 23 consumer groups filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission charging YouTube with violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by collecting personal data on children without parental consent. YouTube is owned by Google.

The complaint was co-filed Monday by the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC) and the Center for Digital Democracy.

Source: Consumer groups file FTC complaint against YouTube for collecting kids’ personal data without parental consent – Marketing Land

Fact Check: What Mark Zuckerberg Said About Facebook, Privacy and Russia

Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, is testifying before Congress on Tuesday and Wednesday to answer questions about the social network’s failure to protect the data of millions of its users and its role in Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Here are some of Mr. Zuckerberg’s claims, as well as some claims from the lawmakers, which we fact checked.

Source: Fact Check: What Mark Zuckerberg Said About Facebook, Privacy and Russia – The New York Times

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