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Category Archives for "Other"

Germany fines Facebook for under-reporting complaints

German authorities have fined Facebook 2 million euros for under-reporting complaints about illegal content on its social media platform in breach of the country’s law on internet transparency.

Germany’s Federal Office of Justice said that by tallying only certain categories of complaints, the web giant had created a skewed picture of the extent of violations on its platform.

Source: Germany fines Facebook for under-reporting complaints – Reuters

Duch privacy watchdog warns banks not to use payments for marketing

On Wednesday Duch data protection authority – Autoriteit Persoonsgegevens –  announced that banks should not offer their customers products on the basis of their confidential spending patterns. It added that all banks ‘should therefore take a good look at their policies around direct marketing.’

It its letter, it warns that certain transactions are considered particularly sensitive in terms of privacy law, such as payments to ‘hospitals, pharmacies, casinos, sex clubs….religious groups [and political parties]’ and that bank clients have an expectation of privacy.

Source: Look away: privacy watchdog warns banks not to use payments for marketing – DutchNews.nl – Live

EU regulator launches third Apple investigation

The principle regulator for Apple in Europe, the Irish Data Protection Commission, has begun a third investigation into data privacy standards at the tech giant.

Speaking this week, a spokesperson for the Irish DPC confirmed that Apple’s compliancy with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will go under examination for the third time in the last month.

Source: EU regulator launches third Apple investigation

Longer Privacy Policies Are Better?

Everyone knows that most consumers don’t read privacy policies because they’re too long and confusing. Right?

But maybe that’s the wrong way to think about it. Privacy policies are useless from a consumer perspective regardless of whether they’re long or short, said Justin Brookman, director of privacy and technology policy at Consumer Reports.

Full article: Longer Privacy Policies Are Better – And Other Surprising Takeaways From The FTC’s PrivacyCon | AdExchanger

Facebook fined by Italian DPA €1M over Cambridge Analytica scandal 

Italy’s privacy regulator fined Facebook €1 million Friday for violations connected to the Cambridge Analytica scandal — the largest fine against the social networking giant connected to that case.

The €1 million fine follows a previous £500,000 sanction by the British privacy watchdog, which similarly found that the tech giant had not sufficiently protected people’s online data

Source: Facebook fined €1M over Cambridge Analytica scandal – POLITICO

Facebook to give data on hate speech suspects to French courts

Facebook has agreed to hand over the identification data of French users suspected of hate speech on its platform to judges.

The decision by the world’s biggest social media network comes after successive meetings between Zuckerberg and Macron, who wants to take a leading role globally on the regulation of hate speech and the spread of false information online.

Source: Exclusive: In a world first, Facebook to give data on hate speech suspects to French courts – Reuters

Privacy Shield Ombudsperson Confirmed by US Senate

On June 20, 2019, Keith Krach was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become the Trump administration’s first permanent Privacy Shield Ombudsperson at the State Department.

The role of the Privacy Shield Ombudsperson is to act as an additional redress avenue for all EU data subjects whose data is transferred from the EU or Switzerland to the U.S. under the EU-U.S. and the Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework, respectively.

Source: Privacy Shield Ombudsperson Confirmed by the Senate

FTC Takes Action Against Companies Misrepresenting Compliance with the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield 

The Federal Trade Commission announced that it has taken action against a number of companies that allegedly misrepresented their compliance with the EU-U.S., as well as Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield frameworks and other international privacy agreements.

FTC and SecurTest, Inc. reached a settlement agreement over allegations that SecurTest falsely claimed to participate in the Privacy Shield. The FTC also reported that it sent warning letters to 13 companies for claiming to participate in the U.S.-EU and U.S.-Swiss Safe Harbor frameworks and to two companies for falsely claiming to participate in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Cross-Border Privacy Rules system.

Source: FTC Takes Action Against Companies Misrepresenting Compliance with the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield and Other International Privacy Agreements

Openly Operated wants to make privacy policies actually mean something

Openly Operated is a set of guidelines for auditing how apps and web services deal with user data, like a combination of a report card and a seal of approval. But it’s also a bid to change the terms of the privacy debate.

An OO-certified app or site must meet three criteria. First, it needs to demonstrate “a basic level of transparency” by making its code and infrastructure — among other things — public and fully documented. Second, it needs to lay out its policy in the form of “claims with proof,” establishing what user data is collected, who can access it, and how it’s being protected. Third, those claims must be evaluated by an OO-certified auditor who then makes the audit results public.

Source: Openly Operated wants to make privacy policies actually mean something – The Verge

ICO admits its own cookie policy is non-compliant with GDPR

The Information Commissioners Office has admitted that its current consent notice relating to the use of cookies on devices failed “to meet the required GDPR standard”.

The issue relates to the automatic placing of cookies on a user’s mobile device when accessing the ICO’s website, which one complaint argued was in breach of the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, which sits alongside GDPR.

Source: ICO admits its own cookie policy is non-compliant with GDPR | IT PRO

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