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Category Archives for "Research"

Study finds privacy concerns put most adults off dealing with a firm

A new study of over 2,000 US adults and 500 marketing executives has found that data privacy is now a business issue.

The research, conducted by customer engagement platform, Braze finds reports that 84% of adults have decided against engaging with a company because it needed too much of their personal information, and three in five consumers have gone so far as to delete an app from their phone for that same reason.

Source: #Privacy: New study finds privacy concerns put most adults off dealing with a firm

Over 15 billion records were exposed last year

The total number of records exposed in 2019 increased by 284 percent compared to 2018. In total, there were over 15.1 billion records exposed.

There were 7,098 breaches reported in 2019, a one percent increase on 2018, though the gap is anticipated to grow throughout Q1 2020 as more 2019 incidents come to light, says the new Risk Based Security report, 2019 Year End Data Breach QuickView Report.

Source: #Privacy: Over 15 billion records were exposed last year

GDPR enforcement is on fire!

Data protection authorities (DPAs) are rapidly increasing their GDPR enforcement activities and here are some trends coming to surface.

While fines are not always particularly high, in terms of volume, data protection authorities (DPAs) are rapidly increasing their GDPR enforcement activities.

DPAs have levied 190 fines and penalties to date. Spain leads the pack as Europe’s most active regulator, followed by Romania (21) and Germany (18).

Failures of data governance – not security – trigger the most fines and penalties. Breaches are just a starting point. However, compromised data from even a single customer can be expensive.

Read full article: Guess what? GDPR enforcement is on fire! | ZDNet

Researchers Find ‘Anonymized’ Data Is Even Less Anonymous Than We Thought

Corporations love to pretend that ‘anonymization’ of the data they collect protects consumers. Studies keep showing that’s not really true.

When it was revealed that Avast is using its popular antivirus software to collect and sell user data, Avast CEO Ondrej Vlcek first downplayed the scandal, assuring the public the collected data had been “anonymized”—or stripped of any obvious identifiers like names or phone numbers.

But analysis from students at Harvard University shows that anonymization isn’t the magic bullet companies like to pretend it is. Previous studies have shown that even within independent individual anonymized datasets, identifying users isn’t all that difficult. But when data from different leaks are combined, identifying actual users isn’t all that difficult.

Source: Researchers Find ‘Anonymized’ Data Is Even Less Anonymous Than We Thought – VICE

GDPR Subverted by Cookie Consent Tools

New study suggests that many websites are navigating around GDPR by tailoring the design of their cookie consent tools and using dark patterns to provide a misleading veneer of a consent agreement.

According to the researchers, the study illustrates “the extent to which illegal practices prevail, with vendors of CMPs turning a blind eye to — or worse, incentivising — clearly illegal configurations of their systems.”

Source: GDPR Subverted by Cookie Consent Tools, Study Reveals – CPO Magazine

Privacy investments get positive ROI

Cisco’s 2020 data privacy benchmark study provide strong evidence that privacy has become an attractive investment even beyond any compliance requirements. Organizations that get privacy right improve their customer relationships, operational efficiency, and bottom-line results.

The data in this report is derived from the Cisco Annual Cybersecurity Benchmark Study, a double-blind survey of 2800 security professionals in 13 countries. Survey respondents represent all major industries and a mix of company sizes.

Source: From Privacy to Profit: Achieving Positive Returns on Privacy Investments

Most Americans support the right to be forgotten online

Americans prefer to keep certain information about themselves outside the purview of online searches, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

74% of U.S. adults say it is more important to be able to “keep things about themselves from being searchable online,” while 23% say it is more important to be able to “discover potentially useful information about others.”

Source: Most Americans support the right to be forgotten online | Pew Research Center

€114 Million in Fines Imposed by EU Authorities Under GDPR

New findings from DLA Piper show that 160,000 data breach notifications reported across 28 European Union Member States and data protection authorities have imposed €114 million in monetary fines under the GDPR for a wide range of infringements. Not all fines were related to data breach infringements, however.

In terms of the total value of fines issued by geographical region, France (€51m), Germany (€24.5m) and Austria (€18m) topped the rankings, whilst the Netherlands (40,647), Germany (37,636) and the UK (22,181) had the highest number of data breaches notified to regulators.

Source: €114m in Fines Imposed by Euro Authorities Under GDPR – Infosecurity Magazine

Ubiquitous Surveillance Cameras Are Changing Our Understanding of Human Behavior

Surveillance footage is providing new insights into how humans interact in public. But should scientists be able to see it?

Watchdogs like Tony Porter, the U.K.’s surveillance camera commissioner, warn that governments’ increasing ability to watch everything all the time will lead to both predictable and unforeseen invasions of privacy.

Full article: Ubiquitous Surveillance Cameras Are Changing Our Understanding of Human Behavior – VICE

2019 registers over €400m in data protection fines in Europe

Last year, the data protection authorities in the EEA imposed 190 fines with a total cost of over €410,000,000, according to a new report by Federprivacy.

The study analyzed official sources of information in the 30 countries that are part of the European Economic Area (EEA).

The most active Authority for Data Protection was Italy (GPDP) with 30 actions in 2019, followed by Spain (AEPD) with 28, and Romania (ANSPDCP) with 20. The strictest has been the UK (ICO) with €312,000,000 of sanctions (76% of the total).

Source: #Privacy: 2019 registers over €400m in data protection fines in Europe

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