Category Archives for "Security"

Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail

Carole Cadwalladr just wanted to insure her car. Six months later, she found a mass of personal details held by a firm she had never contacted that is run by Leave.EU’s biggest donor, Arron Banks. How did it get there?

Source: Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail | Technology | The Guardian

Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime

Citizens may object to their social media mining by law enforcement, but the practice can keep the public safe.

Police departments should continue to monitor social media to inform law enforcement. After all, social media sites are full of data that can make police interventions more effective, from posts about crimes in progress to damning evidence offered freely by criminals and even live videos of crimes. However, in designing these initiatives, police departments need to pay closer attention to the Constitution as well as the needs of citizens.

Source: Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime | WIRED

How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR

Mobile location firms that collect latitude and longitude stats have been particularly scrutinized because the data is considered personal under GDPR, requiring that consumers consent to providing companies with their information—which could potentially creep consumers out if they know their location is being mined for advertising.

Los Angeles location firm Factual is aiming to mitigate GDPR’s risks by scraping all of its data collected on European citizens. It will then get to work rebuilding its database by asking for consumers’ “explicit consent.” The company’s contracts now also require that partners have obtained data explicitly.

Source: How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR – Adweek

New EU fines will apply to ‘old’ data breaches

The new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will require that companies that process personal data inform the relevant data protection authority in case of a data breach.

A European Commission official confirmed that data breaches that happened before 25 May, when GDPR comes into force, but are kept silent until after that, will also be liable for such a fine.

Source: New EU fines will apply to ‘old’ data breaches

No boundaries for Facebook data: third-party trackers abuse Facebook Login

So far in the No boundaries series, we’ve uncovered how web trackers exfiltrate identifying information from web pages, browser password managers, and form inputs .

Today we report yet another type of surreptitious data collection by third-party scripts that we discovered: the exfiltration of personal identifiers from websites through “login with Facebook” and other such social login APIs.

Source: No boundaries for Facebook data: third-party trackers abuse Facebook Login

NIST releases latest version of its Cybersecurity Framework

On April 16, 2018, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) unveiled Version 1.1 of its widely known Cybersecurity Framework, which incorporates changes based on feedback collected through comments, questions, and workshops held in 2016 and 2017.

The Cybersecurity Framework aims to focus on industries vital to national and economic security, including energy, banking, communications, and defense, and provides a universal structure that can be tailored to varied methods of cybersecurity by compiling effective standards, guidelines, and practices into one framework.

Source: NIST releases latest version of its Cybersecurity Framework

A Short History of Mark Zuckerberg’s Privacy Gaffes at Facebook

Facebook has been updating its privacy settings for more than a decade. Will this time be different?

Maybe these tools will put users in control of our personal information once and for all, and as a result, we will trust Facebook to protect our data better in the future. But if history is any guide, we’ll see this episode again, judging by this not-at-all exhaustive list of the times Zuckerberg has apologized for giving you privacy jitters, and assured you it would all be absolutely fine, eventually.

Source: A Short History of Mark Zuckerberg’s Privacy Gaffes at Facebook | WIRED

Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

Almost three years ago, the global domain name authority ICANN chartered a working group to consider how to build a replacement for the WHOIS database, a publicly-accessible record of registered domain names.

Because it includes the personal information of millions of domain name registrants with no built-in protections for their privacy, the legacy WHOIS system exposes registrants to the risk that their information will be misused by spammers, identity thieves, doxxers, and censors.

Source: Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

Cops Around the Country Can Now Unlock iPhones, Records Show

A Motherboard investigation has found that law enforcement agencies across the country have purchased GrayKey, a relatively cheap tool for bypassing the encryption on iPhones, while the FBI pushes again for encryption backdoors.

Source: Cops Around the Country Can Now Unlock iPhones, Records Show – Motherboard

Russian cyber threat pushes UK to sign world’s largest digital security pact 

Theresa May will strengthen the UK’s digital defences through a £15m online security pact with Commonwealth allies amid warnings over the growing threat of cyber warfare from Russia.

Leaders from the 53-nation bloc are expected to sign the world’s largest cyber declaration, pledging to join forces to combat criminals and hostile actors engaged in potentially devastating cyber attacks, and to support smaller nations to raise their security standards by 2020.

Source: Russian cyber threat pushes UK to sign world’s largest digital security pact | The Independent

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