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Category Archives for "Surveillance"

Automated facial recognition trials backed by UK home secretary

Home Secretary Sajid Javid has given his backing to the police in their trials of facial recognition cameras.

The surveillance software, which is designed to help spot suspects in public spaces, has been trialled by several forces, including the Met.

Civil liberties campaigners have criticised the technology, which is the subject of a legal challenge.

Source: Automated facial recognition trials backed by home secretary – BBC News

Facebook Embeds ‘Hidden Codes’ To Track Who Sees And Shares Your Photos

Facebook has been accused (again) of tracking user photos through hidden embedded codes.

As the social media giant finalizes the terms of its record $5 billion fine, continual privacy headlines will not help it move past the allegations of data misuse.

Source: Facebook Embeds ‘Hidden Codes’ To Track Who Sees And Shares Your Photos

Facial Recognition Tech Is Growing Stronger, Thanks to Your Face

Large databases, built with images from social networks and dating services, contain millions of pictures of people’s faces. Some are shared worldwide. There is no oversight of the data sets.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials employed facial recognition technology to scan motorists’ photos to identify undocumented immigrants. The F.B.I. also spent more than a decade using such systems to compare driver’s license and visa photos against the faces of suspected criminals.

Full article: Facial Recognition Tech Is Growing Stronger, Thanks to Your Face – The New York Times

Palantir Manual Shows How Law Enforcement Tracks Families

Palantir’s surveillance software has become a backbone of US law enforcement, particularly Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Palantir’s secret user manuals for law enforcement shows that with just the name of a person, law enforcement can use Palantir’s software to map that target’s family relationships, get their Social Security number, address, phone number, height, weight, and eye color. Add a license plate number, and Palantir’s system can often allow law enforcement to track where people have been during any period of time.

Source: Palantir Manual Shows How Law Enforcement Tracks Families | WIRED

Facebook’s face recognition software should worry us.

Facebook holds “the largest facial dataset to date”—powered by DeepFace, Facebook’s deep-learning facial recognition system.

Policymakers and experts are now beginning to weigh how the government’s use of facial recognition should be regulated and constrained. A crackdown on how government agencies can use the technology needs to consider how companies do, too.

Full article: Facebook’s face recognition software should worry us.

ECHR rules uninterrupted CCTV surveillance of detainees is breach of privacy

The case originated in three applications against the Russian Federation lodged with the European Court of Human Rights (Court). The applicants complained, in particular, that constant surveillance of their cells, at times by female guards, by closed-circuit television cameras had violated their right to respect for their private life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.

The Court found that the permanent CCTV camera monitoring of the applicants, all in detention, breached their right to private life in contravention of Article 8 of the Convention.

Read ruling

Government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs

A government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs — including from driver’s licenses, passports and mug shots — that can be searched using facial recognition technology.

The fact was reported by the Government Accountability Office at a congressional hearing in which both Democrats and Republicans raised questions about the use of the technology.

The figure reflects how the technology is becoming an increasingly powerful law enforcement tool, but is also stirring fears about the potential for authorities to intrude on the lives of Americans.

Source: Government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs [Video]

Amazon’s helping police build a surveillance network with Ring doorbells

While residential neighborhoods aren’t usually lined with security cameras, the smart doorbell’s popularity has essentially created private surveillance networks powered by Amazon and promoted by police departments.

Police departments across the country, from major cities like Houston to towns with fewer than 30,000 people, have offered free or discounted Ring doorbells to citizens, sometimes using taxpayer funds to pay for Amazon’s products. While Ring owners are supposed to have a choice on providing police footage, in some giveaways, police require recipients to turn over footage when requested.

Source: Amazon’s helping police build a surveillance network with Ring doorbells – CNET

Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous

A new product from UAE firm NNTC shows where this tech is headed next. The AR glasses have an 8-megapixel camera embedded in the frame which allows the wearer to scan faces in a crowd and compare with a database of 1 million images.

Technology like this means law enforcement agencies can adopt facial recognition algorithms and use them in public spaces with less hassle and fewer distractions. That means it’s likely to be used more widely.

Source: Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous – The Verge

Apple is making corporate ‘BYOD’ programs less invasive to user privacy

When people bring their own devices to work or school, they don’t want IT administrators to manage the entire device.

But until now, Apple only offered two ways for IT to manage its iOS devices: either device enrollments, which offered device-wide management capabilities to admins or those same device management capabilities combined with an automated setup process. At Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference last week, the company announced plans to introduce a third method: user enrollments.

Source: Apple is making corporate ‘BYOD’ programs less invasive to user privacy | TechCrunch

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