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Category Archives for "Surveillance"

Washington Senate passes bill to regulate governments’ use of facial-recognition technology

Washington state senators Wednesday approved a bill that would begin regulating the use of facial-recognition programs by local and state governments. The bill now goes to the House for consideration.

Under the bill the surveillance would be allowed in support of law enforcement with a search warrant or an agency director’s determination under some conditions, such as an emergency that involves risk of death.

Source: Washington Senate passes bill to regulate governments’ use of facial-recognition technology | The Seattle Times

Australia’s Home Affairs pushes back against encryption law proposals

Both Labor and Australia’s Independent National Security Legislation Monitor have proposed judicial approvals before cops and spooks can access encrypted communications, but the Department of Home Affairs isn’t keen.

The Department of Home Affairs has rejected criticisms of Australia’s controversial encryption laws, including the often-cited need for external judicial oversight and the impact of the laws on the tech industry.

Source: Home Affairs pushes back against encryption law proposals | ZDNet

London Police Just Turned On Facial Recognition In One Of The World’s Busiest Shopping Districts

Just across from the Microsoft store on London’s Regent Street, and just outside the entrance to the Oxford Circus tube station, cameras atop dark blue police vans are watching passersby.

The tech is fairly simple: Cameras scan faces and when one matches with one on their list of wanted criminal suspects, the police swoop in. But it’s more complex than that, with claims that the technology will often falsely identify people as criminals, especially when they’re not white.

Protesters say the tech is racist and destroys people’s privacy. Police say they’re trying to keep London safe.

Source: London Police Just Turned On Facial Recognition In One Of The World’s Busiest Shopping Districts

EU Police Push for Pan-European Facial Recognition Network

The proposal to link the EU’s facial recognition databases would likely connect them to the U.S. as well, in a massive consolidation of biometric data.

A report drawn up by the national police forces of 10 EU member states, led by Austria, calls for the introduction of EU legislation to introduce and interconnect such databases in every member state.

The report was produced as part of discussions on expanding the Prüm system, an EU-wide initiative connecting DNA, fingerprint, and vehicle registration databases for mutual searching.

Source: EU Police Push for Pan-European Facial Recognition Network

Congress eyes killing controversial surveillance program

Momentum is growing in Congress to reject the Trump administration’s request to reauthorize a controversial surveillance program.

Lawmakers have until March 15 to reauthorize expiring provisions under the USA Freedom Act, including a controversial phone records program known as Section 215.

Meanwhile, House Democrats on the Intelligence and Judiciary committees unveiled legislation this week that would repeal the NSA’s authority to run the program. That bill is scheduled to get a vote in the Judiciary Committee on Wednesday.

Source: Congress eyes killing controversial surveillance program | TheHill

Moscow deploys facial recognition technology for coronavirus quarantine

Moscow is using facial recognition technology to ensure people ordered to remain at home or at their hotels under coronavirus quarantine do so.

Russia has temporarily barred Chinese nationals from entering the country to curb the spread of the virus, but has welcomed Russians who return home with an order to spend two weeks at home, even in the absence of symptoms.

Source: Moscow deploys facial recognition technology for coronavirus quarantine – Reuters

Automated facial recognition breaches GDPR, says EU digital chief

Margrethe Vestager, the European Commission’s executive vice president for digital affairs, has said that automated facial recognition breaches GDPR as it doesn’t gain consent.

GDPR classes information on a person’s facial features as biometric data, which is labeled as “sensitive personal data.” The use of such data is highly restricted, and typically requires consent from the subject — unless the processing meets a range of exceptional circumstances.

Vestager told reporters that the Commission will further investigate automated facial recognition before introducing legislation, allowing member states to make their own domestic decisions in the meantime.

Source: Automated facial recognition breaches GDPR, says EU digital chief

EU backs away from call for blanket ban on facial recognition tech

New draft of AI paper drops suggestion of five-year moratorium on surveillance tech.

In a draft of a paper on artificial intelligence to be published next week, the European Commission finds that facial recognition is prone to inaccuracy, can be used to breach privacy laws, and can facilitate identity fraud.

However, unlike the previous draft, the paper no longer includes the suggestion that the commission should consider a blanket moratorium of five years – a period during which states could study the technology’s impact before rolling it out in public spaces.

Instead the latest draft puts the onus on individual member states to assess how and when they wish to permit the use of facial recognition.

Source: EU backs away from call for blanket ban on facial recognition tech

The state of tracking and data privacy in 2020

January 2020 felt like a turning point. CCPA went into effect, Google Chrome became the latest browser to commit to a cookie-less future and, after months of analytics folks sounding the alarm, digital marketers sobered to a vision of the future that looks quite different than today.

Here’s where search marketers find themselves in the current entanglement of data and privacy and where we can expect it to go from here.

Read full article: The state of tracking and data privacy in 2020 – Marketing Land

Mobile Device IDs Will Be The Next Ad Tracker To Bite The Dust

Neither Apple nor Google – which is fresh off announcing its plan to kill third-party cookies in Chrome less than two years from now – has taken concrete steps to eliminate their respective device IDs as of yet, but the app ecosystem should be preparing for that eventuality.

Device IDs have proven not to be the privacy-preserving solutions they were meant to be, and now it’s time for another change.

Read full article: Mobile Device IDs Will Be The Next Ad Tracker To Bite The Dust

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