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Category Archives for "Surveillance"

Notorious Spyware Vendor Pushes COVID-19 Tracking Solution

A notorious spyware firm currently defending in a lawsuit on spying on WhatsApp users is marketing its COVID-19 tracking solution to governments around the world. But nevermind that, the notorious malware vendor is now selling a COVID-19 tracking app.

On October 29th, 2019, WhatsApp published a statement informing the users about a cyberattack the team stopped earlier in May 2019. In the statement, WhatsApp attributed the attack to NSO Group, an Israeli firm that sells spyware to governments and “authorized agencies” around the globe.

Source: Notorious Spyware Vendor Pushes COVID-19 Tracking Solution | forklog.media

Lawful Interception Market worth $8.8 billion by 2025

According to report “Lawful Interception Market″, lawful interception market size is projected to grow from USD 3.6 billion in 2020 to USD 8.8 billion by 2025, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 19.7% during the forecast period.

The major factors driving the growth of the lawful interception market include penetration of smart devices, increase in cyber-crimes, and counter terrorism initiatives adopted by government to curb potential terror attacks.

Source: Lawful Interception Market worth $8.8 billion by 2025 | Daily Article News

You can have privacy and fight Covid-19

You don’t have to give up privacy in fight against Covid, says Leonardo Cervera Navas, Director European Data Protection Supervisor, EDPS.

“We do not have to give up privacy entirely. It is perfectly possible to stop the contagion while at that same time have anonymity in place. It does not have to be one of the other,” or so said Leonardo Cervera Navas, Director at the EDPS.

Full article: You can have privacy and fight Covid, says Leonardo Cervera Navas of EDPS

Privacy watchdog approves French Covid-19 contact tracing app

France’s privacy watchdog CNIL on April 26 gave a conditional green light to a government-backed scheme to monitor people infected with coronavirus.

The issue of how to keep tabs on sufferers has sparked privacy concerns in several countries but the CNIL gave the nod to the StopCovid scheme subject to civil liberty guarantees and regular oversight.

The French device will, if the country is to begin a gradual emergence from lockdown on May 11, enable creation of an index of sufferers via a smartphone app along the lines of a model touted notably by Singapore.

The idea is to send an alert to those who have downloaded the app if they come into close proximity, for example, on public transport, with those who have tested positive for the new coronavirus and who are on the app register.

Source: Covid-19: Privacy watchdog approves French contact tracing app | The Star Online

COVID-19 contact tracing apps being deployed around the world

As countries begin to lift lockdowns from COVID-19, they are relying on contact tracing apps to identify and break the transmission chain of the disease.

While some Asian countries have implemented their contact tracing apps with strict surveillance measures, Europe and the U.S. are scrambling to build apps with privacy in mind. Countries are working with app developers and technology companies to develop contact tracing in hopes they can contain the transmission of COVID-19.

Full article: Here are the contact tracing apps being deployed around the world

Germany switches sides in privacy contact tracing solution backing Apple and Google

Germany appears to have undertaken a volte-face in the approach it takes to combine privacy and contact tracing, supporting an approach which also has support from Apple and Google.

The race has been on to create a way that enables the tracing of people who have been in the close proximity of an individual who had tested positive for Covid-19, while preserving privacy. The solution lies with anonymity, using bluetooth connectivity with smart phones.

Source: Germany switches sides in privacy contact tracing solution backing Apple and Google

Coronavirus didn’t kill our privacy — it just exposed the corpse

In most countries only minor amendments of the laws sufficed to introduce Covid-19 surveillance, which normally would be an eye opener. It is the new normal, where privacy is no longer an issue or not even a “nuisance” for the power hungry.

The pandemic is an opportunity to mobilize the grassroots privacy effort and adapt to emergencies. If we don’t, tyrannies will act for the ‘greater good.’

Full article: Coronavirus didn’t kill our privacy — it just exposed the corpse

UK ICO Releases Its Opinion on Apple and Google Partnership to Build COVID-19 Contact Tracing Technology

Elizabeth Denham, the UK Information Commissioner, has released an opinion in response to the joint effort announced by Apple Inc. and Google LLC to enable the use of Bluetooth technology to help governments and health agencies reduce the spread of COVID-19 by building contact-tracing technology into iOS and Android smartphones.

Opinion concludes that the “Contact Tracing Framework” (CTF) being developed supports data protection principles. The approach taken by the Information Commissioner in her opinion highlights the pragmatic leadership demonstrated by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in enabling organizations to process personal data for the purposes of combatting COVID-19.

Source: UK ICO Releases Its Opinion on Apple and Google Partnership to Build COVID-19 Contact Tracing Technology

Facebook releases county-by-county maps showing people reporting COVID-19 symptoms

Facebook released its first county-by-county maps of the U.S. on Monday showing the prevalence of self-reported COVID-19 symptoms based on data it has collected.

The maps, which will be updated daily, are meant to help health officials allocate resources and decide where parts of society can be reopened. They use information from a voluntary survey Facebook has been prompting users to take.

Source: Facebook releases county-by-county maps showing people reporting COVID-19 symptoms

Android Users Battling Google Can’t Seek Intervention By Appeals Court

A group of Android users have lost another round in a privacy battle with Google over alleged location tracking.

U.S. District Court Judge Edward Davila in San Jose, California rejected the Android users’ request to immediately appeal his earlier ruling dismissing their claim that Google violated the California Invasion of Privacy Act.

Source: Android Users Battling Google Can’t Seek Intervention By Appeals Court 04/17/2020

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