Free tools and resources for Data Protection Officers!

Category Archives for "Surveillance"

Lifting the Cloak of Secrecy From NYPD Surveillance Technology

For too long, the New York Police Department has secretly deployed cutting-edge spy tech, without notice to the public. Many of these snooping devices invade our privacy, deter our free speech, and disparately burden minority and immigrant communities. Fortunately, a proposed ordinance (“the POST Act”) would lift the cloak of secrecy, and help the people of New York City better control police surveillance technology.

Source: Lifting the Cloak of Secrecy From NYPD Surveillance Technology | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Police super-database prompts Liberty warning on privacy

A new super-database being built for the UK police represents a “grave” risk to privacy, a leading human rights group has said. Liberty claims the government is glossing over concerns that the database, the largest built for British law enforcement, threatens civil liberties.

Source: Police super-database prompts Liberty warning on privacy

UK intelligence agencies illegally spied on Privacy International

UK intelligence agencies MI5, MI6 and GCHQ violated the law by collecting and examining data of human rights group Privacy International. The data was collected as part of two mass surveillance programmes called Bulk Communications Data and Bulk Personal Datasets.

Source: UK intelligence agencies illegally spied on privacy organisation | UK News | Al Jazeera

Can Europe’s GDPR Save the Internet?

In an world increasingly driven by the ability of private companies and governments to collect vast amounts of personal data online, the European Union’s ambitious new data rules enshrine data. In the Internet age, ordinary people have become extraordinarily vulnerable, because participating in the digital economy and broader society now frequently involves revealing personal information to large organizations that can easily store it, process it, and share it without any input from individuals.

Full article: Can Europe’s GDPR Save the Internet?

Skripal Case Shows the Limits of Surveillance

The U.K.’s ubiquitous surveillance cameras have clearly played an important role in the attribution of the attempted poisoning of an ex-spy in Salisbury in March to the Russian military intelligence. Thanks to the cameras, the two Russian suspects’ movements were tracked exhaustively. But this seeming success also lays bare the biggest problem with universal surveillance: If everyone is tracked, no one is, so the cameras can only perform their function so late after the fact that even those criminals who are identified are less likely to be apprehended.

Full article: Skripal Case Shows the Limits of Surveillance – Bloomberg

China is building a digital dictatorship to exert control over its citizens

What may sound like a dystopian vision of the future is already happening in China. And it’s making and breaking lives. The Communist Party calls it “social credit” and says it will be fully operational by 2020. Within years, an official Party outline claims, it will “allow the trustworthy to roam freely under heaven while making it hard for the discredited to take a single step”.

Full article: Leave no dark corner – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Browsers aim to thwart tracking

New protections in Apple’s Safari and Mozilla’s Firefox browsers aim to prevent companies from turning “cookie” data files used to store sign-in details and preferences into broader trackers that take note of what you read, watch and research on other sites.

Source: Apple, Firefox browsers aim to thwart Facebook, Google tracking

GCHQ data collection regime violated human rights, court rules

UK’s spy agency GCHQ’s methods for bulk interception of online communications violated privacy and failed to provide sufficient surveillance safeguards, the European court of human rights has ruled. However, court found that GCHQ’s regime for sharing sensitive digital intelligence with foreign governments was not illegal and explicitly confirmed that bulk interception with tighter safeguards was permissible.

The ruling, which follows Edward Snowden’s whistleblowing revelations, is a comprehensive assessment by the ECHR of interception operations carried out until recently by UK intelligence agencies.

Source: GCHQ data collection regime violated human rights, court rules | UK news | The Guardian

Firefox’s New Browser Will Keep Brands From Stalking You

Future versions of Firefox will block third-party tracking codes, and trackers that take too long to load, by default. Users won’t need to take any action. Solution will not block ads (though it may prevent some from being displayed). Feature is already tested and will be released later this year.

Source: Firefox’s New Browser Will Keep Brands From Stalking You | WIRED

Faces as data: A guide to video surveillance and the GDPR

With personal data and its protection, we usually think about names, addresses, phone numbers birthdates etc. first, then other sensitive information, such as bank account details, medical records or places of work. But, given that personal data can be defined as “any information relating to an identified or identifiable person”, images must also be treated with the same care under the same GDPR regulations.

Read article: Faces as data: A guide to video surveillance and the GDPR

>