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Category Archives for "Surveillance"

Ubiquitous Surveillance Cameras Are Changing Our Understanding of Human Behavior

Surveillance footage is providing new insights into how humans interact in public. But should scientists be able to see it?

Watchdogs like Tony Porter, the U.K.’s surveillance camera commissioner, warn that governments’ increasing ability to watch everything all the time will lead to both predictable and unforeseen invasions of privacy.

Full article: Ubiquitous Surveillance Cameras Are Changing Our Understanding of Human Behavior – VICE

EU court adviser: data privacy laws should apply in national security cases

The European Court of Justice should uphold its 2016 decision that personal data cannot be seized and held indiscriminately by governments even on national security grounds, the court’s advocate general said in an opinion on Wednesday.

Reacting to four cases in France, Belgium and Britain in which governments called for greater powers to override data privacy, the advocate general, Manuel Campos Sánchez-Bordona, argued that EU law applies.

Source: EU court adviser: data privacy laws should apply in national security cases – Reuters

Google Chrome to drop third-party cookies by 2022

Chrome will replace third-party cookies with browser-based tools and techniques aimed at balancing personalization and privacy.

Google announced support for third-party cookies in its Chrome browser would be phased out “within two years.” The company seeks to replace them with a browser-based mechanism.

Google’s stated objective is to create “a secure environment for personalization that also protects user privacy.” Google says that for ad targeting it’s “exploring how to deliver ads to large groups of similar people without letting individually identifying data ever leave [the] browser.”

Source: Google Chrome: Third-party cookies will be gone by 2022 – MarTech Today

German Constitutional Court to hold hearing on surveillance powers of the “German NSA”, the BND

The Federal Constitutional Court will hold a hearing on the BND Act on January 14th and 15th, 2020.

Plaintiffs expect a fundamental ruling defining the limits of intelligence gathering abroad. An alliance of six media organisations and the Gesellschaft für Freiheitsrechte (GFF) had filed a constitutional complaint against the BND Act, which gives broad surveillance powers to the Federal Intelligence Service (BND).

Source: German Constitutional Court to hold hearing on surveillance powers of the “German NSA”, the BND – GFF – Gesellschaft für Freiheitsrechte e.V.

Data watchdog raps EU asylum body for snooping

The European Asylum Support Office combed through social media to monitor refugee routes to Europe for three years. The agency sent weekly reports on its findings to member states, the EU Commission and institutions such as UNHCR and Interpol.

EASO lacks a legal basis for collecting personal data on social media, the EU’s data protection supervisor Wojciech Wiewiórowski said in a recent letter. He imposed a temporary ban on the project.

Source: Data watchdog raps EU asylum body for snooping

Max Schrems Files GDPR Complaints with French DPA on Cookie Use

European privacy advocacy group None of your business (NOYB)—led by Max Schrems—announced it had filed three formal complaints with the French data protection authority (CNIL) against three French websites for  sending digital signals to tracking companies claiming that users had agreed to be tracked online, despite the same users rejecting such cookies.

Despite users going through the trouble of “rejecting” countless cookies on the French eCommerce page CDiscount, the movie guide Allocine.fr and the fashion magazine Vanity Fair, these webpages have sent digital signals to tracking companies claiming that users have agreed to being tracked online.

Source: Say “NO” to cookies – yet see your privacy crumble? | noyb.eu

Lawsuit challenges Trump administration’s policy on collecting foreigners’ social media accounts

Free-speech advocates say in a lawsuit filed Thursday that the policy violates federal law and runs afoul of the Constitution.

The requirement — implemented as part of the president’s controversial crackdown on immigration — amounts to an illegal surveillance dragnet that threatens to chill political expression online, according to a group of documentary filmmakers, who filed their case with the backing of two advocacy groups, the Brennan Center for Justice and the Knight First Amendment Institute.

Source: Lawsuit challenges Trump administration’s policy on collecting foreigners’ social media accounts – The Washington Post

FISA reauthorization: What will Europe think?

US Congress is considering permanently reauthorizing four provisions, two of which are unused, of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that are set to expire Dec. 15.

Considering the ongoing scrutiny of U.S. government surveillance practices, lawmakers should carefully consider the permanent reauthorization of the unused provisions.

Full article: FISA reauthorization: What will Europe think?

DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports

Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers — including American citizens — be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology.

The Department of Homeland Security says it expects to publish a proposed rule next July. Facial recognition is already being tested by several airlines at a number of U.S. airports.

Source: DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports | Time

Quebec Will Force Uber to Share Trip Location Data

Privacy advocates are concerned that the new law can paint an unsettling picture of people’s movements in Quebec.​

A new law that regulates taxis and ridesharing apps in Quebec will require real-time geolocation data, including pick-up/drop-off points and route information, to be shared with municipal governments and approved third parties.

Source: Quebec Will Force Uber to Share Your Trip Location Data – VICE

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