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Category Archives for "Technology"

GDPR mayhem: Programmatic ad buying plummets in Europe

Since the early hours of May 25, ad exchanges have seen European ad demand volumes plummet between 25 and 40 percent in some cases, according to sources. Ad tech vendors scrambled to inform clients that they predict steep drops in demand coming through their platforms from Google. Some U.S. publishers have halted all programmatic ads on their European sites.

Full article: GDPR mayhem: Programmatic ad buying plummets in Europe – Digiday

Recommendations on processing data in the cloud

A recent report published by Ireland’s data protection watchdog provides a helpful reminder to businesses to take additional steps to secure personal information when processing it in the cloud, avoid the common pitfalls associated with technology-related data breaches and take advantage of cloud solutions securely.

According to the report, the majority of the technology-related breaches resulted from a data controller’s use of cloud-based environments hosted by third party cloud service providers.

Full article: Recommendations on processing data in the cloud

Tech’s invasion of our privacy made us more paranoid in 2018

People are flocking to privacy tools online that block trackers following your every click, companies are hiring more privacy experts, and politicians are fighting for legislation to force companies to be more open about how they use your data.

While Cambridge Analytica was the biggest event, other privacy mistakes throughout the year continued to grow people’s concerns.

Full article: Tech’s invasion of our privacy made us more paranoid in 2018 – CNET

Microsoft calls for AI facial-recognition laws

Microsoft wants new laws to put some constraints on the use and development of facial recognition.

Tech companies are faced with a “commercial race to the bottom”, which should have a “floor of responsibility” that allows competition but outlaws the use of facial recognition in ways that harm democratic freedom or enable discrimination.

The call to action comes as China increasingly adopts facial recognition to monitor public spaces. Analysts estimate China’s 200 million surveillance cameras will grow to 300 million in the next two years as tech companies beef up surveillance offerings.

Full article: Microsoft: Here’s why we need AI facial-recognition laws right now | ZDNet

Why Doesn’t My Ad Blocker Block ‘Please Turn Off Your Ad Blocker’ Popups?

It is technically pretty simple to disable those pop ups, but many ad blocker plugins choose to let them live.

According to the AdBlock, “many of our users would love it,” and “we have the technical ability,” but that a publisher should have a right to at least attempt to persuade users to whitelist. And other ad blocker companies have a similar stance.

Full article: Why Doesn’t My Ad Blocker Block ‘Please Turn Off Your Ad Blocker’ Popups?

In China, your car could be talking to the government

China has called upon all electric vehicle manufacturers in China to make the same kind of reports — potentially adding to the rich kit of surveillance tools available to the Chinese government as President Xi Jinping steps up the use of technology to track Chinese citizens.

Full article: In China, your car could be talking to the government

Camera traps designed for animals are now invading human privacy

Over the past two decades automated wildlife cameras—known as camera traps—have proven invaluable in ecological research and conservation management. Their sensitive motion detectors have enabled scientific surveys of rare or shy animals in dense forest and as a consequence have seen broader use around the world.

But camera traps frequently take pictures of people as well as wildlife. This has important implications for privacy and human rights and may ultimately undermine conservation goals.

Source: Camera traps designed for animals are now invading human privacy | Ars Technica

Why We Need to Audit Algorithms

Algorithmic decision-making and artificial intelligence (AI) hold enormous potential and are likely to be economic blockbusters, but we worry that the hype has led many people to overlook the serious problems of introducing algorithms into business and society. Indeed, we see many succumbing to what Microsoft’s Kate Crawford calls “data fundamentalism” — the notion that massive datasets are repositories that yield reliable and objective truths, if only we can extract them using machine learning tools.

A more nuanced view is needed. It is by now abundantly clear that, left unchecked, AI algorithms embedded in digital and social technologies can encode societal biases, accelerate the spread of rumors and disinformation, amplify echo chambers of public opinion, hijack our attention, and even impair our mental wellbeing.

Full article: Why We Need to Audit Algorithms

Germany proposes router security guidelines

The German government published at the start of the month an initial draft for rules on securing Small Office and Home Office (SOHO) routers.

Once approved, router manufacturers don’t have to abide by these requirements, but if they do, they can use a special sticker on their products showing their compliance.

Full article: Germany proposes router security guidelines | ZDNet

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