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Category Archives for "Technology"

Apple Defends Delay of Privacy Feature, Slams Facebook

Apple Inc. on Thursday slammed Facebook Inc. and other internet giants for their ad-targeting practices in response to a letter questioning a decision by the iPhone maker to delay a new privacy feature.

Apple’s letter defended the company’s decision to delay an iPhone feature that requires users to give explicit permission before letting apps track them for advertising purposes. The enhancement was added as part of the company’s iOS 14 operating system in September, but a requirement that all apps use it was delayed until early 2021 after several developers, including Facebook, said the change would hurt their businesses.

Source: Apple Defends Delay of Privacy Feature, Slams Facebook – Bloomberg

LAPD Bans Use Of Commercial Facial Recognition

The Los Angeles Police Department has banned the use of commercial facial recognition systems.

The LAPD, the third-largest police department in the United States, issued a moratorium on the use of third-party facial recognition software on Nov. 13

News showed that its officers were using Clearview AI, a facial recognition platform that has taken data from Facebook and other social media platforms.

Source: LAPD Bans Use Of Commercial Facial Recognition

TikTok expands parental controls to include search, commenting and account privacy

TikTok announced it’s expanding its parental control feature set known as Family Pairing to give parents additional tools to manage various aspects of their teen’s account as well as their privacy on the social video platform.

The new tools will allow parents to set their teen’s account to private, control whether their Liked Videos are visible to others, control who can comment on the teen’s videos and even decide whether the teen is allowed to use TikTok’s search feature.

Source: TikTok expands parental controls to include search, commenting and account privacy | TechCrunch

DHS Plans to Start Collecting Eye Scans and DNA

US Department of Homeland Security is planning to collect unprecedented levels of biometric information from immigration applicants and their sponsors — including U.S. citizens.

While some types of applicants have long been required to submit photographs and fingerprints, a rule currently under consideration would require practically everyone applying for any kind of status, or detained by immigration enforcement agents, to provide iris scans, voiceprints and palmprints, and, in some cases, DNA samples. A tangled web of defense and surveillance contractors, which operate with little public oversight, have already begun to build the infrastructure that would be needed to store these records.

Source: DHS Plans to Start Collecting Eye Scans and DNA

How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

As facial recognition technology (FRT) spreads, regulators have tools to ensure that this technology does not result in inaccurate or biased outcomes.

Policymakers can ensure that responsible protocols are in place to validate that facial recognition technology works as billed and to inform decisions about whether and how to use FRT. In building a framework for responsible testing and development, policymakers should empower regulators to use stronger auditing authority and the procurement process to prevent facial recognition applications from evolving in ways that would be harmful to the broader public.

Full article: How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

Apple hits out at campaign group’s ‘inaccurate’ privacy complaint

Apple has strongly denied claims from privacy campaigners that it has breached Europe’s ePrivacy directive through its Identifier for Advertisers (IDFA).

The non-profit campaign group Noyb said that the Apple operating system on iPhones creates IDFA without the user’s knowledge or consent, thereby breaching Europe’s Privacy Directive.

However a spokesperson for Apple, responding to the allegations, said: “The claims made against Apple in this complaint are factually inaccurate and we look forward to making that clear to privacy regulators should they examine the complaint. Apple does not access or use the IDFA on a user’s device for any purpose.

Source: Apple hits out at campaign group’s ‘inaccurate’ privacy complaint

Tim Berners-Lee launches enterprise-friendly decentralised web platform in move to ‘restore power on the web’

Tim Berners-Lee has launched an enterprise-friendly decentralised web platform using the open-source technology, Solid, to “restore power” on the web.

On November 9, founding father of the World Wide Web, Berners-Lee – in collaboration with John Bruce – launched Enterprise Solid Server, the enterprise-friendly infrastructure that supports the company’s decentralised web platform, Inrupt.

The premise of the technology is straightforward: store your personal information separately in a personal “pod” (personal online data store) and share only what is necessary with services only when you are using them.

Source: Tim Berners-Lee launches enterprise-friendly decentralised web platform in move to ‘restore power on the web’

Forensic Genealogy Cracks Cold Cases Amid Privacy Concerns

Millions of people will unwrap at-home ancestry testing kits this holiday season and eagerly swab their cheeks and mail in the saliva, hoping their DNA will unlock clues about their heritage or reveal long-lost relatives.

The tests, which can cost as little as $59, offer entertainment and a chance to uncover family secrets. But with law enforcement increasingly mining the DNA databases to solve cold cases, as in the arrest last week of a Lehigh County man suspected in the 1969 murder of a San Diego woman, experts say consumers should think about their privacy when they hand over their DNA.

Source: Forensic Genealogy Cracks Cold Cases Amid Privacy Concerns | Pennsylvania News | US News

Canadian privacy watchdog publishes recommendations on regulating use of AI

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (the OPC) yesterday outlined recommendations for regulating the use of artificial intelligence, including a rights-based approach.

The recommendations include creating a right for a meaningful explanation of automated decisions, and a right of subjects to contest these decisions. It also wants to require organisations to design AI systems from their conception in a way that protects privacy. The OPC is also suggesting it receives powers to issue binding orders and financial penalties to ensure compliance.

Source: Canadian privacy watchdog publishes recommendations on regulating use of AI

Apple hit with privacy complaints over iPhone tracking tool

A privacy group Noyb has filed complaints with the German and Spanish data protection authorities under the EU’s Cookie Law against Apple over a tool in iOS 14 that allegedly tracks iPhone user behaviour without consent.

The group claims that Apple’s Identifier for Advertisers (IDFA) activates when a user sets up an iPhone without offering a chance to consent or even notifying them of its existence.

Source: Apple hit with privacy complaints over iPhone tracking tool | IT PRO

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