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Category Archives for "Technology"

Bill to Ban Face Surveillance Introduced in US Congress

Senator Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), along with Senator Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (WA-07) and Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley (MA-07) today introduced legislation to stop government use of biometric surveillance, including facial recognition tools.

The Facial Recognition and Biometric Technology Moratorium Act prohibits the use of facial recognition and other biometric technologies by federal agencies, including Customs and Border Protection.

Source: Bill to Ban Face Surveillance Introduced in Congress

The CNIL Can’t Legally Forbid Cookie Walls Under GDPR

France’s highest administrative court has ruled that the country’s data protection authority, the CNIL, does not have the right to ban cookie walls.

The Conseil d’État, a division of the French government that serves as its supreme court of administrative justice, issued a ruling on Friday in response to litigation initiated last year by French trade organizations.

Source: The CNIL Can’t Legally Forbid Cookie Walls Under GDPR | AdExchanger

Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm

In what may be the first known case of its kind, a faulty facial recognition match led to a Michigan man’s arrest for a crime he did not commit.

Mr. Williams’s case combines flawed technology with poor police work, illustrating how facial recognition can go awry.

Full article: Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm – The New York Times

EU to pay 300 million EUR for face and fingerprint recognition

The European Union has awarded a major contract for a new fingerprint and face recognition system. A consortium consisting of the two French companies IDEMIA and Sopra Steria is to set up and subsequently manage a Shared Biometric Matching System (sBMS).

For this purpose, fingerprints and facial images from five databases will be stored in a single file. Completion is planned in two years, but in an earlier large-scale IT project of the EU, one of the partners was seven years behind schedule.

Source: Project Interoperability: EU to pay 300 million EUR for face and fingerprint recognition – Matthias Monroy

PwC facial recognition tool criticised for home working privacy invasion

Accounting giant PwC has come under fire for the development of a facial recognition tool that logs when employees are absent from their computer screens while they work from home.

The technology, which is being developed specifically for financial institutions, recognises the faces of workers via their computer’s webcam and requires them to provide a written reason for any absences, including toilet breaks.

Source: PwC facial recognition tool criticised for home working privacy invasion – Personnel Today

Attorney General pens letters to Apple, Google urging them to protect consumer privacy on COVID-19 tracing apps

Attorney General Letitia James is calling on two major tech companies to protect consumer information and privacy as New Yorkers and Americans across the country continue to battle COVID-19.

In letters penned to Apple and Google, AG James is urging both companies to make sure that existing and future third-party contact tracing apps published through Apple’s App Store and Android’s Play Store do not inappropriately collect and retain users’ sensitive information. The letter also asks that the companies make it clear to consumers the difference between apps launched by governmental public health agencies, meant to notify individuals they may have been exposed to the virus, and third-party contact tracing apps, which could possibly take advantage of consumers for financial gain.

Source: Attorney General pens letters to Apple, Google urging them to protect consumer privacy on COVID-19 tracing apps – amNewYork

Norway pulls its coronavirus contacts-tracing app after privacy watchdog’s warning

One of the first national coronavirus contacts-tracing apps to be launched in Europe is being suspended in Norway after the country’s data protection authority raised concerns that the software, called “Smittestopp,” poses a disproportionate threat to user privacy — including by continuously uploading people’s location.

Following a warning from the watchdog Friday, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (FHI) said today it will stop uploading data from tomorrow — ahead of a June 23 deadline when the DPA had asked for use of the app to be suspended so that changes could be made. It added that it disagrees with the watchdog’s assessment but will nonetheless delete user data “as soon as possible.”

Source: Norway pulls its coronavirus contacts-tracing app after privacy watchdog’s warning | TechCrunch

Amazon Bans Police Use of Its Face Recognition for a Year

Amazon on Wednesday banned police use of its face-recognition technology for a year, making it the latest tech giant to step back from law-enforcement use of systems that have been criticized for incorrectly identifying people with darker skin.

Amazon said it will still allow organizations such as the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children to use the technology.

Source: Amazon Bans Police Use of Its Face Recognition for a Year | Time

IBM ends all facial recognition business

IBM CEO Arvind Krishna announced that the company would no longer sell facial recognition services, calling for a “national dialogue” on whether it should be used at all.

It’s unclear whether or how the company will continue to perform AI research along these lines.

Source: IBM ends all facial recognition business as CEO calls out bias and inequality | TechCrunch

Critical Vulnerability Could Have Allowed Hackers to Disrupt Traffic Lights

A critical vulnerability affecting traffic light controllers made by SWARCO could have been exploited by hackers to disrupt a city’s traffic lights.

Researchers at ProtectEM, a Germany-based company that provides cybersecurity guidance and solutions for industrial and embedded systems, discovered that SWARCO’s CPU LS4000 traffic light controllers are vulnerable to attacks due to an open port designed for debugging.

Source: Critical Vulnerability Could Have Allowed Hackers to Disrupt Traffic Lights | SecurityWeek.Com

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