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Category Archives for "Technology"

How will adtech tackle Google, Apple privacy changes?

A slew of questions. An abundance of potential answers. And no clear path forward. That’s what the future currently holds for the advertising technology space as far as privacy goes. Between Google’s phasing out of third-party cookies and Apple’s iOS 14 privacy updates, there’s a lot on adtech companies’ plates and necessary adjustments are imminent.

Broadening controls and transparency for users is one piece to the puzzle, but the other is developing the means to ensure those controls and transparency are stood up and maintained. “It comes down to building technically demonstrable accountability systems that can show and demonstrate continuously that these transparency and control signals are being conformed with.”

Full article: How will adtech tackle Google, Apple privacy changes?

Why hot new social app Clubhouse spells nothing but trouble

Clubhouse was founded in April last year and gained modest traction in the early phases of the pandemic after a $12m investment by Andreessen Horowitz, the noisiest venture capital firm in Silicon Valley, at which point it had 1,500 users and was valued at $100m.

But the hoopla tended to obscure some uncomfortable facts about Clubhouse. There’s the contact-uploading requirements mentioned earlier which, as one commentator put it, are not only “telling the app developer that you’re connected to those people, but you’re also telling it that those people are connected to you – which they might or might not have wanted the app to know.

Source: Why hot new social app Clubhouse spells nothing but trouble | Social media | The Guardian

Investigation Finds Facebook Did Little to Prevent Apps from Sharing Sensitive User Data

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo on February 18, 2021 accepted a New York State Department of Financial Services report detailing the findings of an investigation into the transmission of sensitive user data by application and website designers to Facebook.

Following a report by the Wall Street Journal, the Governor directed DFS to perform an investigation which found that app developers regularly sent Facebook sensitive data, including medical and personal data, derived from consumers’ usage of third-party websites and applications. The data was then shared with Facebook by app developers as part of Facebook’s free online data analytics services. Though such data-sharing violated Facebook policy, Facebook took few steps to enforce the policy or to block the flow of sensitive data prior to the state’s investigation.

Source: Press Release – February 18, 2021: Governor Cuomo Accepts Report from DFS on Facebook Investigation | Department of Financial Services

WhatsApp details what will happen to users who don’t agree to privacy changes

WhatsApp said earlier last week that it will allow users to review its planned privacy update at “their own pace” and will display a banner to better explain the changes in its terms. But what happens to its users who do not accept the terms by the May 15 deadline?

If they still don’t accept the terms, “for a short time, these users will be able to receive calls and notifications, but will not be able to read or send messages from the app,” the company added in the note. The “short time” will span a few weeks.

Source: WhatsApp details what will happen to users who don’t agree to privacy changes | TechCrunch

How CTV Audience Data Is Changing Ad Funded Streaming Forever

The major shifts within the advertising industry over the past decade have all been driven by increased ability to target people. First going from desktop to mobile, and then even more so by shifting from mobile to social.

However, people-based TV advertising is going to ultimately move dollars from cable to CTV but it’s not going to stop there. If the open-garden ad tech ecosystem continues to grow, more and more advertising dollars will shift away from social platforms and into the streaming world.

Full article: How CTV Audience Data Is Changing Ad Funded Streaming Forever | AdExchanger

Big Data Is Booming in the U.S., but Other Countries Are Making the Rules

Lawmakers and regulators in some of the world’s largest countries are ramping up enforcement of privacy laws, revising statutes or debating new rules. The upshot, executives and privacy experts say, is a vast expansion of protections for personal data and a fast-changing, potentially expensive landscape for companies that use such information to power the digital economy.

The frameworks aim to give consumers more control over their data as the coronavirus pandemic pushes more daily life online. Companies that break the rules could face fines or penalties—risks that may be difficult to anticipate. Privacy experts say such debates hinge on governments’ ability to protect citizens’ data from other governments—including the U.S.—or access data for security reasons.

Full article: Big Data Is Booming in the U.S., but Other Countries Are Making the Rules

Tracker pixels in emails are now an ‘endemic’ privacy concern

Spy pixels, also known as tracking pixels or web beacons, are invisible, tiny image files — including .PNGs and .GIFs — that are inserted in the content body of an email.

They may appear as clear, white, or another color to merge with the content and remain unseen by a recipient and are often as small as 1×1 pixels. Similar pixels are also widely used on web domains to track visitors.

However, according to Hey co-founder David Heinemeier Hansson, they also represent a “grotesque invasion of privacy.”

Full article: Tracker pixels in emails are now an ‘endemic’ privacy concern | ZDNet

Aiming to Cash In on Data, European Firms Grapple With Privacy Laws

Companies in Europe want to share the personal data of consumers with other firms or turn it into business applications without violating privacy rules, but there is no consensus on how to avoid revealing such potentially sensitive information.

Privacy restrictions in the European Union’s 2018 General Data Protection Regulation initially caused companies to reconsider whether they could cash in on personal data collected on consumers. Now, some companies are finding ways to avoid revealing that data, including consumers’ identities.

Full article: Aiming to Cash In on Data, European Firms Grapple With Privacy Laws

Swedish Police unlawfully used facial recognition app, says Privacy Watchdog

Upon news in the media of the Swedish Police Authority using the application Clearview AI for facial recognition the Swedish Authority for Privacy Protection (IMY) initiated an investigation against the Police.

The investigation concludes that Cleaview AI has been used by the Police on a number of occasions. According to the Police a few employees have used the application without any prior authorisation.

IMY imposed an administrative fine of SEK 2,500,000 (approximately EUR 250,000) on the Police Authority for infringements of the Criminal Data Act. IMY also ordered the Police to conduct further training and education of its employees in order to avoid any future processing of personal data in breach of data protection rules and regulations.

Source: Police unlawfully used facial recognition app – Integritetsskyddsmyndigheten

Florida water treatment facility hack used a dormant remote access software

A hacker who last week tried to poison a Florida city’s water supply used a remote access software platform that had been dormant for months, Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri told CNN on Tuesday.

The cyber-intruder got into Oldsmar’s water treatment system twice on Friday — at 8 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. — through a dormant software called TeamViewer. The software hadn’t been used in about six months but was still on the system.

Once inside the system, the hacker adjusted the level of sodium hydroxide, or lye, to more than 100 times its normal levels. he identity of the hacker, or hackers, isn’t yet known. The incident highlights how some critical infrastructure systems are vulnerable to hacking because they are online and use remote access programs, sometimes with lax security.

Source: Florida water treatment facility hack used a dormant remote access software, sheriff says – CNN

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