fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Category Archives for "Technology"

London Police Will Deploy Live Facial Recognition Cameras

London’s Metropolitan Police announced Friday they would begin rolling out new facial recognition cameras, despite controversy.

The Metropolitan Police, the U.K.’s biggest police department with jurisdiction over most of London, announced Friday it would begin rolling out new “live facial recognition” cameras in London, making the capital one of the largest cities in the West to adopt the controversial technology.

Source: London Police Will Deploy Live Facial Recognition Cameras | Time

Leaked Documents Expose the Secretive Market for Your Web Browsing Data

An Avast antivirus subsidiary sells ‘Every search. Every click. Every buy. On every site.’ Its clients have included Home Depot, Google, Microsoft, Pepsi, and McKinsey.

The documents show that the Avast antivirus program installed on a person’s computer collects data, and that its subsidiary Jumpshot repackages it into various different products that are then sold to many of the largest companies in the world.

Some clients paid millions of dollars for products that include a so-called “All Clicks Feed,” which can track user behavior, clicks, and movement across websites in highly precise detail.

Source: Leaked Documents Expose the Secretive Market for Your Web Browsing Data – VICE

London police to deploy live facial recognition cameras

The Metropolitan police has announced that it will begin the operational use of Live Facial Recognition (LFR) technology.

The cameras will be linked to a database of suspects, to which if the system detects someone an alert is generated, and ff the system detects someone who is not on the database their information will not be saved.

Source: #Privacy: Metropolitan police to deploy facial recognition cameras

CNIL launches a public consultation on its draft recommendation on “cookies and other trackers”

On 4 July 2019, the CNIL published guidelines on the application of Article 82 of the French Data Protection Act. This article governs actions aiming at storing or gaining access to information already stored in the terminal of a user, i.e. in particular the use of cookies or other trackers when a user visits a website.

The CNIL conducted a consultation during the fall of 2019, in order to prepare a draft recommendation proposing operational procedures for obtaining consent. This draft is now subject to public consultation until 25 February, with a view to preparing the final version of the recommendation.

Source: CNIL launches a public consultation on its draft recommendation on “cookies and other trackers”

Reflecting on APAC Data Protection and Cyber-security Highlights for 2019 (and what lies ahead!)

2019 saw continued growth and change in data protection and cyber-security across the Asia-Pacific. Following the implementation of the GDPR in May, 2018, many jurisdictions moved to review and strengthen existing data privacy and cyber-security laws.

In addition, 2019 saw regulators publishing findings in respect of some of the largest data incidents of 2018. We have set out below the key highlights of the year and what to look out for in 2020.

Full article: Reflecting on APAC Data Protection and Cyber-security Highlights for 2019 (and what lies ahead!)

‘Prepare for ICO to utilise its wider powers’: UK regulator issues warning to adtech

The UK’s data regulator, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), has issued a warning to any adtech companies which have failed to “use the window of opportunity to engage and transform” their practices – it’s coming for them.

The ICO’s update on its investigation into the adtech sector reveals it focused on specific issues such as the treatment of “special category data” – like race, sexuality and health – as well as how secure data is as it’s passed through the supply chain and the thorny issue of Legitimate Interest.

Source: ‘Prepare for ICO to utilise its wider powers’: UK regulator issues warning to adtech | The Drum

EU to police digital assistants

European Union privacy watchdogs are gearing up to police digital assistants after revelations that Amazon.com Inc. workers listened in on people’s conversations with their Alexa digital assistants.

EU regulators are now working on a common approach on how to police the technology. But the move toward common guidelines for digital assistants means companies should avoid fines — for now.

Source: Amazon Alexa Eavesdropping Spurs EU-Wide Privacy Safeguards – Bloomberg

EU considers ban of facial recognition for up to five years

The European Commission has revealed it is considering a ban on the use of facial recognition in public areas for up to five years.

The European Commission wants time to work out how to prevent the technology being abused. Exceptions to the ban could be made for security projects as well as research and development.

 

Source: Facial recognition: EU considers ban of up to five years – BBC News

Why your palm could be safer than fingerprints or facial recognition?

Amazon and Apple both have patents for palm scanners and Chinese startups have already started using the tech in locks and vending machines.

Palm recognition systems work by identifying vein patterns and lines and creases on the hand’s surface, ideally using cameras and infrared to avoid contact. Compared with a face, palmprint is not privacy sensitive.

Source: Why your palm could be safer than fingerprints or facial recognition – Amazon and Apple both have patents for palm scanners and Chinese startups have already started using the tech in locks and vending machines | Abacus

Carrefour’s fingerprint payments to be investigated by Belgian privacy agency

The Belgian Data Protection Authority has stated that there is “a good chance” it will investigate Carrefour’s fingerprint payment system.

The supermarket chain announced on Tuesday that it will organise a pilot project allowing clients to pay for their groceries with their fingerprints in a store in the centre of Brussels. The clients will be able to pay by scanning their finger at the cash register, after which the money will disappear from their bank account.

Source: Carrefour’s fingerprint payments to be investigated by Belgian privacy agency

>