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Category Archives for "Technology"

Europe introduces IoT Cybersecurity standard

ETSI, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute has released a new cybersecurity standard for consumer Internet of Things devices in February 2019 (TS 103 645). These rules are intended to apply to consumer devices that are connected to network infrastructures.

The standard describes thirteen recommendations to realise the goal of ensuring safer IoT devices and to bridge the safety gap. The standard is not mandatory and remains a good practice document.

Source: Europe – Keeping your connected devices secure: Europe introduces IoT Cybersecurity standard

Silicon Valley – Not Governments – Will Kill Encryption

It is Silicon Valley that will roll back the protections of encryption, not for the needs of governments to combat terrorists and criminals, but for their own profit-minded needs to continue mining, monetizing and manipulating their users.

The growing popularity of end-to-end encryption threatens to upend this uneasy truce between digital security and the ability of web companies to mine our personal data.

Full article: Silicon Valley – Not Governments – Will Kill Encryption

Can AI Be a Fair Judge in Court? Estonia Thinks So

Estonia plans to use an artificial intelligence program to decide some small-claims cases, part of a push to make government services smarter.

In the most ambitious project to date, the Estonian Ministry of Justice has asked Estonia’s chief data officer Otto Velsberg and his team to design a “robot judge” that could adjudicate small claims disputes of less than €7,000 (about $8,000). Officials hope the system can clear a backlog of cases for judges and court clerks.

Full article: Can AI Be a Fair Judge in Court? Estonia Thinks So

With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been

There are hundreds of stores using facial recognition – none that have any rules or standards to prevent abuse.

With facial recognition, getting caught in one store could mean a digital record of your face is shared across the country. Stores are already using the technology for security purposes and can share that data – meaning that if one store considers you a threat, every business in that network could come to the same conclusion. One mistake could mean never being able to shop again.

Full article: With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been – CNET

Personal information management systems: A new era for individual privacy?

PIMS, also referred to as personal data stores, personal data spaces, or personal data vaults, are systems that allow people to control their personal data and manage their online identity by enabling individuals to gather, store, update, and share personal data.

Importantly, PIMS also let people allow, deny, or withdraw consent to third-parties for access to their personal data. PIMS can facilitate compliance with existing privacy laws by making it easier for organizations to gain effective consent of users, which can be an administrative burden.

Full article: Personal information management systems: A new era for individual privacy?

A New Age of Warfare: How Internet Mercenaries Do Battle for Authoritarian Governments

Sophisticated surveillance, once the domain of world powers, is increasingly available on the private market. Smaller countries are seizing on the tools — sometimes for darker purposes.

NSO, a private company based in Herzliya, Israel, has hired former government hackers to ply their trades for foreign governments.

Full article: A New Age of Warfare: How Internet Mercenaries Do Battle for Authoritarian Governments – The New York Times

MoviePass founder wants to use facial recognition to score you free movies

PreShow is developing an app to earn you free movie tickets – to any film in any theater – if you watch 15 to 20 minutes of high-end advertising.

But PreShow hinges on what some may consider a cost and others consider a bargain: facial recognition. PreShow’s app will only unlock with your phone’s facial recognition technology. And while you’re watching the ads to earn that free ticket, your phone’s camera monitors your level of attention. Walk away or even obscure part of your face? The ad will pause after five seconds.

Source: MoviePass founder wants to use facial recognition to score you free movies – CNET

Think about privacy the next time you ask Alexa the weather

More and more people are starting to think twice before asking Alexa for the daily forecast. According to a recent PwC survey, 38 percent of participants chose not to purchase a smart device because they “don’t want something listening in on [their lives] all the time.” Additionally, 28 percent of respondents are “concerned about privacy issues with [their] data/security.”

Full article: Think about privacy the next time you ask Alexa the weather

EU Advocate General Issues Opinion on Consent for Cookies and Intersection with the GDPR

On March 21, 2019, Advocate General Szpunar released his opinion in the Planet49 case, currently pending before the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). The case centers on the use of consent for the processing of personal data and consent for the use of cookies.

In the Advocate General’s view, the pre-ticked box for cookies does not provide a valid active consent under the GDPR nor under the ePrivacy Directive. Moreover, he considers that the ePrivacy Directive’s consent requirement for cookies applies irrespective of whether the collected data qualify as personal data.

Source: EU Advocate General Issues Opinion on Consent for Cookies and Intersection with the GDPR

How the tragic death of Do Not Track ruined the web for everyone

A decade ago, a simple browser setting – called Do Not Track – promised to make it easy to protect your online privacy from nosy advertisers. To opt out of being tracked, you’d check a box in your browser’s settings.

It was a great idea. Too bad it never came anywhere near to living up to its promise.

For all practical purposes, DNT died years ago. But Apple’s removal of the Do Not Track preference from Safari for Macs and iOS in an update in early February officially signaled the end of what might have been a workable understanding between consumers and the advertisers that rely on ad-tech networks to target them.

Full article: How the tragic death of Do Not Track ruined the web for everyone

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